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WOMEN' S BUILDING 






GAME 



TENNIS 




• The story of Southwestern University is built of untiring efforts and fragments 
of lives of courageous, unselfish, determined men. It is a story of sunny days 
and clouds, a story illuminated by splendid and unimpeded progress and 
checkered with dark periods which saw stagnation and retrogression, a story 
which commands respect, admiration and love for the institution and prophe- 
sies for it a glorious future. 

• In 1840 the Congress of the Republic approved the charter which founded 
the first college in Texas at Ruterville. Ruterville College, named for a mis- 
sionary to Texas — Dr. Martin Ruter, who had tried during the brief time be- 
tween his arrival in Texas and his death to establish a university — was the 
first of four institutions which, in 1873, were united to establish a central uni- 
versity of Texas Methodism. 






■ 





THE ANNEX 

• Wesleyctn College, located in San Augustine, was the second educational 
venture of Texas Methodism. Its charter, of far more liberal provisions than 
those of the Ruterville charter, was granted January 16, 1844. 

• John W. P. McKenzie, whose health had failed from excessive ministerial 
toil, settled in Red River County, Texas, and opened a private school. From 
this modest beginning the school grew until at the time it was chartered as 
McKenzie Institute in 1854, it had an enrollment of over three hundred students. 
The school was not formally under the control of the church until 1859 when 
President McKenzie gave the property into the control of the conference. 







DR. MARTIN RUTHER 



DR. FRANCIS MOOD 



DR. CLAUDE CARR CODY 



• Soule University was opened at Chappell Hill on 
February 1, 1856, and by the twenty-second of the 
same month secured its charter. In 1868 Dr. Francis 
Asbury Mood was offered the presidency of Soule 
University which was, even then, doomed to short 
life by depression and rapidly spreading yellow fever 
epidemics. 




MARCHING TO CHURCH 

• Dr. Mood presented in 1869 a carefully prepared 
plan for a central university supported jointly by all 
the Texas Conferences. On February 1, 1870, the 
Board of Trustees of the proposed Texas University 
to be located at Georgetown, Texas, held its first 
meeting. With an enrollment of one hundred stu- 
dents Texas University opened in 1873. In 1875 
this school was chartered as Southwestern Univer- 
sity, and in 1876 four students were graduated from 
the institution. 

• Amid much agitation, women were admitted to the 
University in 1878. They were not allowed to attend 
balls or dancing parties, skate, go home for Christ- 
mas holidays or take part in any event of dramatic 

' nature. Every Sunday morning the girls were 
marched in a double file to church. Chaperones 
walked before them, behind them and to the side 
of them to see that no girl smiled, waved, or dropped 
a note to a boy. As an April Fool's joke 
in 1880 forty-four students, by a written 
agreement, refused to attend class. The 
entire group was dropped from the roll 
of the University and allowed to re-enter 
only after they had individually begged 
,ih§J2aidon of the entire faculty. 




© The girls caused no little trouble. One night they 
lowered a huge basket from the second floor by 
means of sheets tied together. Every few minutes 
they pulled to see if the basket was heavy for they 
were expecting some boys to come for a party. 
Dr. Allen, who always carried a cane with which he 
punished any boy who dared cross the fence which 
surrounded the Annex, saw the basket and got in 
it. The girls unknowingly pulled him up. When they 
were ready to pull him over the window sill they saw 
who it was and let him fall. Either Dr. Allen didn't 
recognize the girls or the fall jarred his memory so 
badly that he forgot who they were for he never found 
the guilty party. 

• Until 1886 the women and men students were kept 
strictly separated. In that year, to solve the problem 
of class room space, the curators recommended that 
"when thought necessary, the faculty may bring 
advanced and discreet women pupils to recite with 
the University classes." 

o In 1887 the faculty repealed the rule forbidding 
secret societies and recognized the three original 
fraternities. 

o With the beginning of the new century the voice 
of the student body was heard. In answer to a pe- 
tition from the student body asking for permission to 
participate in intercollegiate athletics the curators 
decided to allow intercollegiate athletics with the 
exception of football. 





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RUTERVILLE COLLEGE 



• During the administration of President Hyer admis- 
sion requirements in Greek and Latin were raised; 
this being a "final step in the consummation of the 
policy to make the admission requirements of South- 
western University fully measure up to those of the 
best American colleges." 




A PICNIC ON THE SAN GABRIEL 

• On June 2, 1906, the corner stone was laid for a 
new boy's dormitory. The faculty decided unani- 
mously that no better name could be found than that 
of the founder of the University so the dormitory was 
named Mood Hall. 

■• Money subscribed in Georgetown was applied to 
the construction of the Williamson County Science 
Building, the corner stone of which was laid during 
commencement exercises in 1916. 

• In this period Southwestern University lost two of 
its oldest faculty members. Upon his retirement in 

1914 Professor Fletcher Young, who had been teach- 
ing since 1881, was made professor-emeritus. In 

1915 "The Grand Old Man of Southwestern" — Dr. 
Claude Carr Cody, who rendered more than thirty- 
six years of service — resigned on account of his 
failing health. 





DEBATE CLUBS 

• Caught in the general hysteria at the entering of 
the World War, many students rushed into the army. 
Of these Southwestern Students who left college, 
fifteen gave their lives to their country. 

• On a night in 1924 the wood and stone structure 
of the Women's Annex burned, fortunately without 
injury to any person. The girls, supposing the alarm 
to be only a fire drill, marched out into the night. The 
only item of value to be brought from the burning 
building was Miss Kuykendall's china, which was 
completely demolished by a trunk thrown from an 
upper floor. Work on the new Women's Building 
was completed in 1926. 




ATHLETICS 

• After half a century of struggle to force all the 
University owned books into two rooms on the third 
floor of the Administration Building ample space was 
secured in the form of the new Cody Memorial 
Library. 

• Early in the centennial year ground was broken 
for the West Gymnasium. 

• After several years of hard work on the part of 
our president, Dr. J. W. Bergm, the future of the Uni- 
versity looks today brighter than ever 
before. May the next century in the story 
of Southwestern University be as majes- 
tic as that of the past. 



"**. 



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BATHING BEAUTIES 









emorie& 



A glorious year at Southwestern . . . Classes 
. . . Exams . . . flunked and passed . . . Chapel 
speakers leaving just "one last thought" . . . 
Visits with the Dean . . . Pledgings . . . Proms . . . 

These and many other precious memories will 
become an integral part of any student priv- 
ileged to obtain his college education on the 
campus of the Black and Gold. But, as the drip 
of water will wear away the hardest rock, time 
will blur the most vivid memories. 

If, after many years, a glance at the pages of 
this yearbook will bring back memories, long 
since forgotten, then we feel that the ultimate 
purpose of a yearbook has been accomplished. 

The 1940 Sou 'Wester, we hope, will be a mem- 
ory book of experiences to be treasured . . . 



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1940 




minteirauon 



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IN MEMDRIAM 







CHARLES MESSEHVIE EDENS 

"Farewell a word that must be, and has been — 
A sound which makes us linger; — yet farewell.' 



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IRf MEMDHIAM 




MARY ELIZABETH CARAWAY 

"In small proportions we just beauties see; 

And in short measures life may perfect be." 
"So sweetly she bade me adieu 

I thought that she bade me return." 







^Dedicated to 

DR. JOHN C. BDDBEY 



Whose work in the department of physical science has attracted nation- 
wide attention to Southwestern University. His forceful, dynamic personality 
portrays the depth of his character, and the important part he plays in the 
policies of the college. 

An amazing amount of frankness and honesty characterizes his relation 
with all his students. Many a student owes his college success to the sound 
guidance of this truly great person. 




JOHN WIILIAM BEHGI1V Ph.B,D.D. 

President of Southwestern University 



This year Southwestern University has begun the Centennial Celebration, the first event of which 
brought to our campus April 13th and 14th outstanding educators, churchmen and other distinguished 
speakers from over America and our Trustees and hundreds of our ex-students and friends. 

This has been one of the most successful years in the one hundred. No other one year has seen 
the construction of two major buildings, but in 1939-40 the beautiful Cody Memorial Library was com- 
pleted and our students are enjoying the pleasures and advantages of the beautiful building. In the 
winter the contract was let for the West Gymnasium. This also is being constructed of limestone. Gym- 
nasiums are not essentially beautiful, but this building will be a work of art, and the stone out of which 
it is constructed will give it the essential stamina for a physical education plant. It will be nearing 
completion by Commencement and ready for our splendid group of students in the Fall Semester. 
Southwestern University exists for her students, and these buildings are yours through the years. 

Southwestern has the most homogeneous, happy, loyal and enthusiastic group of young people we 
have ever known. We salute you as Centennial students and promise our undergraduates returning in 
the Fall with others whom you will bring with you a splendid Centennial opening and a program for 
Southwestern's 101st year. 

Wishing all you graduates bon voyage in your careers and you undergraduates a jolly vacation 
rappy return in September, I am Lovingly, your President, 

JOHN WILLIAM BERGIN 





OSCAR ALVIN ULLRICH, B. A., M. A., Ph. D. 
Dean of the Faculty 

Greetings to All Students. 

That you love truth, enjoy beauty, worship the LORD, and 

be a friend to man, is the wish of your Dean, 

OSCAR A. ULLRICH. 




RUTH MORGAN FERGUSON, B. A., M. A. 
Dean of Women 

Students of 1939 and 1940. 

My sincere hope for you is that during your years at 
Southwestern you have acquired enough learning to 
broaden your vision, enough wisdom to give you self- 
control, enough friendship to make you sympathetic and 
kind, enough pleasure for true delight, enough culture to 
teach you reverence for all things holy. The possession of 
these great human values will enable you to find your 
place in life and do your work with joy and abiding 
success. May the best of life always be yours. 



Your friend, 



RUTH FERGUSON. 



ISAAC JOEL McCOOK 

Business Manager 

We pay tribute to him who has given Southwestern a 
contribution of executive service and personal influence 
which none other could have given. 




HENRY EDWIN MEYER, B. A.. B. M., B. S. 
Dean of School of Music 

Students at Southwestern University share everyday ex- 
periences of beauty which are not given to all men. May 
we learn before our college days are past that to do well 
in life we must learn to truly appreciate beauty in its 
various aspects. So we shall know that to enjoy sound, 
color, form, manners and moral recititude are all one in the 
art of living. It may be hoped that one day we shall reap 
from the habit of esthetic appreciation a fitness for life that 
is higher than that which we now know and place in the 
universe that is even fairer than the campus of old South- 
western in the spring. 

HENRY MEYER. 




MARGARET MOOD McKINNON. B. A. 

Librarian 

"Aloha" Students 1939-1940: 

For many years, I have been giving a warm welcome to 
Southwestern University students, and for as many years, I 
have been bidding them "good-bye". The first was always 
a joyful event; the last, a much more serious occasion. 
But this June I will say "Aloha" from my beautiful new 
office in the new Cody Memorial Library. One would sup- 
pose that after so many years of saying "Aloha", it would 
become a habit, just one of those routine duties to be per- 
formed in a casual manner. But this is not true. I will never 
get accustomed to saying "Aloha". 

Always at the close of the school year, I am in the depths, 
a Slough of Despond, much deeper than Christian's. So 
once again I must say "Aloha" and gradually adjust my- 
self to your absence. 

MARGARET MOOD McKINNON. 



PEARL ALMA NEAS 

Registrar 

To my Friends, the Students of 1939-1940: 

"One, two, three, four, — sometimes I wish there 'were more" 
was chanted quite wisely in days agone. At the close of 
the school year, we have fond memories of happy days 
spent together. It has ever been our desire to join our 
energies to yours in an effort to find the enduring satisfac- 
tions of life. 

Your years of work and association on the campus can not 
have failed to make you appreciate that the story of South- 
western is one of the triumph of ideals. You may never 
reach your ideal; it may keep floating on and on before 
you. Real education discovers latent and hidden talents 
and capacities of the mind, reaches into the innermost 
depths of the soul, enlarging the heart, arousing ambitions, 
elevating ideals, and leading into the bigger paths of use- 
fulness and service. May you ever keep in mind that 
humility is the only door by which wisdom and greatness 
and peace can enter. I trust that you will go forward with 
steady stride and vision, making every stumbling block a 
stepping stone; that opportunity may overtake you fre- 
quently in the future, and find you always ready in cheer- 
ful good nature, moral earnestness, spiritual grace, and 
resolute will. 

Your friend, 

PEARL ALMA NEAS. 





THE FACULTY 




jBHT s 
HERBERT LEE GRAY. B. A., D. D. Head of Bible and Religion 

Dr. Gray's deep understanding of human nature quickly touches all those with whom he comes in contact. 

GEORGE C. HESTER, B. A., M. A. Head of Departments of History and Political Science 

Mr. Hester's close association with present day political problems gives his students that refreshing quality so that his 
classes are overflowing. The power behind the Centennial Celebration. 

CARL BENTON COMPTON, B. A.. B. F. A. Head of Department of Art 

Energetic, original, flamboyant, eccentric, and many other qualities destine our young artist, Mr. Compton, a bright future. 

JOHN H. UTLEY, B. A.. M. A., Ph. D. Professor of Foreign Languages 

Dr. Utley makes his foreign language classes interesting, the highest compliment that could be made of a foreign lan- 
guage professor. 

ALBERT RUSSEL WAPPLE, B. S., M. A. Head of Department of Mathematics 

A gentleman in the true sense of the word. He is always willing to lend a helping hand. 

ERNST HEYER, ABITURIENTEN ZEUGN1S Instructor in German and Latin 

Potential inventor and aviator. His infinite linguistic abilities are incomprehensive. 

JOHN CAMPBELL GODBEY, B. A., M. A. Head of Department of Physics and Chemistry 

The king of the science building. Prominent in Southwestern athletics. Likes to cook "sausage" over an open fire. Those 
who know him swear by him, and who doesn't know him? , 

SIDNEY BERGIN DUNN, B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

He is known by most students as "Bergin". Good-natured, likeable. He likes to tinker with things he doesn't fully 
understand. 



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THE FACULTY 




GORDON BLOOMFIELD WOLCOTT. B. S., M. S„ Ph. D. Head of Departments of Biology and Geology 

"The Mighty Atom". One of the best liked profs in school because he has the student's viewpoint. 



THOMAS HODGIN MARSH. B. A.. M. A., B. D. 

Wonderful sense of humor. He likes bowling and golf. Students like him. 



Head of Speech and Dramatic Literature 



MYRON LAWSON WILLIAMS, B. A.» M. A. Head of Departments of Business Economics and Sociology 

Identified by a clipped mustache, brief case, and a brisk walk. He makes his classes interesting by an extraordinary use 
of examples. 

LUTHER JACOB WAGGONER, B. A., M. A., B. D. Professor of Religious Education and History 

Known among the students as "Wag". He is Mark Twain and Will Rogers rolled into one. His classes are the current topics 
of conversation. 



Head of Department of English 



CLAUD HOWARD. B. A., M. A.. Ph. D. 

Coach of the Texas Conference championship golf team. Regional president of Alpha Chi. 

LUCY BELL MORGAN. B. A., M. A. Assistant Professor of Spanish 

A charming and interesting speaker who is a master of the culture and legends of the Spanish-speaking countries. 

RHEA WILLIAMS, B. S.. M. S., M. Ed. Professor of Education and Director of Physical Education 

"Campus Apollo". Through his Intramural Athletic program, Mr. Williams has created a greater interest in the art of Phy- 
sical Education and developed a more vivacious school spirit. 

THOMAS MINARD JOHNSON, B. F. A. Director of Band and Orchestra 

Small, quick, energetic, and a commanding air. All go to make him a showman superlative. 




THE FACULTY 




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ROLLAND STORY, B. A. Director of Public Relations 

Ex-students are Rolland's pride and joy. He sees all and knows all. Personality plus. 

ESTHER MESSICK, B. A., M. A. Instructor in Education and Physical Education 

She likes puns and funny sayings. Her student friends are numerous. 

JANE BROWN, B. A. Instructor in Speech and Dramatic Literature 

Miss Brown, our youngest prof, has re-vitalized the Mask and Wig. Her two productions met with unprecedented success. 

IOLA BOWDEN, B. A., B. F. A. Instructor in Piano, Organ, and Theory 

Her quiet, unassuming manner belies the depth of her personality and ability. 

MARGARITA AGRENEVA-SLAVIANSKY Professor of Voice and Director of the Chorus 

Of the Russian Nobility, world wide fame. One of the "Characters" of the campus. 

MARA SLAVIANSKY Instructor in Voice and Theory 

Stars in her eyes. The lilt of life in her voice. 

THOMAS HAMILTON CLARK, B. A Instructor in Business Administration 

Knows the keys of the organ as well as those of the typewriter. 

LOUISE RADER Cashier 

Has a tedious position which she handles remarkably well. 




THE FACULTY 




LOIS CLARK 

Never too busy to help a bewildered student. 



LORENA MOSES 

She is loved by both boys and girls because she remembers when she was a girl. 



SARA MALCOLM WRIGHT, R. N. 

"Grandma." 

JOHN RICHARD MARTIN, M. D. 

"Dr. John." 



EDNA GROTE LEHMBERG 

The way to all students' hearts — food. 



Assistant Registrar 

Hostess of the Women's Building 

University Nurse 

University Physician 

Supervisor of the Dining Hall 

Campus Manager 



F. C. ROBERTS 

"The Fixer." 

MARY WILCOX. B. A. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Miss Wilcox has found the way to the hearts of all those students who know her because she is so sweet. 



ANABELLE MURRAY, B. J. 

Low-heel oxfords, brisk walk, journalist type. Seems to like reforms. 




Instructor of English and Journalism 




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■' 



GRADUATES 




LAUNCELOT BAILEY 

LaGRANGE 

Major: Chemistry 

Editor Sou'Wester '39, '40 

President Barb Association '39, 

'40 
Alpha Chi 

Southwestern Science Society 
Pi Gamma Mu 
Pan American Forum 
German Club 
Philosophy Club 
American Student Union 
Student Assistant in Spanish '35 
Barb Executive Council '39, '40 
Student Senate '39, '40 
Texas Academy of Science 
S. U. Bindery 



JUDY BARTON 

TEMPLE 

Major: Education 
Zeta Tau Alpha Secretary 
Pan American Forum 
Student Assistant in Physical 
Education 



OSCAR BEAVER 



FLORENCE 

Major: Business Administration 

Pan American Forum 

Mask and Wig 

Pi Gamma Mu 

Band '37, '38, '39, '40 

Vice-President '40 

Company Manager 
Track '40 



JOHN BOHMFALK 

SAN ANTONIO 

Major: Chemistry 
Band '38 
Head Waiter 
University Quartette 
Alpha Chi 
German Club 
Science Society 



DAVID BRADY 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: Mathematics 
German Club 
Pi Gamma Mu 



MARGARET BAKER 

HARLINGEN 

Major: Business Ad. 
Alpha Delta Pi 

Secretary, Historian 
Megaphone Staff 
Per Squad 
Mask and Wig 
Night Supervisor '40 



ARTHUR BAYER 

SPRING 

Major: Chemistry and 

Mathematics 
German Club 
Basketball 



CARL BERGQUIST 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: Art 

Phi Delta Theta 

Mask and Wig 

Sou'Wester Photographer 

Art Editor of Magazine 

Camera Club 

Pi Gamma Mu 



NEWELL BOYD 

TEMPLE 

Major: Chemistry 

Kappa Sigma Treasurer '38, '39 

Band '37, '38, '39, '40 

French Club 

Mask and Wig 

Student Senate 

Pi Gamma Mu 

President Junior Class 



LEON BRADY 

WEIR 

Major: History 

Pan American Forum 

Sports Club 




GRADUATES 



RUTH BRANNIES 

INDUSTRY 

Major: Public School Music 
Pi Gamma Mu 
Alpha Chi 
S. C. R. A. 
Orchestra Pianist '40 
Secretary Student Association 
Mozart Society 
Pianist's Club 
Secretary '40 
Secretary Sophomore Class '37 
Barb Council '38 
English Club 
Night Supervisor '39 



DOR W. BROWN 



'40 



GEORGETOWN 

Major: Biology and Chemistry 

Senate 

German Club 

Mask and Wig 

Vice-Pres. Science Society 

Assistant in Chemistry '39 

Tutor in Chemistry '40 

Campus Church Relation 

Committee 
American Chemical Society 
Texas Academy of Science 
Alpha Chi 



GEORGE CARTER 

PORT ARTHUR 

Major: Chemistry 
Band Stage Mgr. 
Mask and Wig Club 
Kappa Alpha 
Megaphone Staff 
Magazine Club 
Philosophy Club 



LUTHER CHRISTMAN 

TEXAS CITY 

Major: Business Administration 
Loyola University 
Mississippi Junior College 
"S." Association 
Football '38, '39 
Intramural Tennis 
Basket Ball '38 
Track '38 
Mask and Wig 



CHARLES ECLES 

RULING 

Major: Speech and Dramatic 

Literature 
Chorus 

Pi Gamma Mu 
Mask and Wig 
Pan American Forum 
Mozart Society '39 
American Student Union '38 




LEWIS BREMER 



LaGRANGE 

Major: Business Administration 

Alpha Chi 

Pi Gamma Mu 

Varsity Football '37, '38, '39, 

All Texas Conference Center 

University Honor Council 

Mood Hall Honor Council 

Student Senate 

Who's Who 



40 



ALICE CADE 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: Dramatic Literature 
Mask and Wig 



JOHN CHILDRESS 

FORT WORTH 

Major: Chemistry 
Phi Delta Theta 
German Club 
Mask and Wig 
Alpha Chi 

Secretary '40 
Science Society 

President '40 
Who's Who '40 
Student Ass't Chem. 
Tutor Chem. 
S. C. R. A. 

Pres. University Sunday 
School Class '40 



L. M. COY 

BEAUMONT 

Major: Political Science and 

History 
Football '39, '40 
Mood Hall H. C. '40 
University Quartette '40 
Basketball 
Senate '40 



TED FEHR 

LOCKHART 

Major: Economics 

Varsity Football '37, '38, '40 

Track 

Pan American Forum 




GRADUATES 




LOUISE FERGUSON 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: English and Spanish 

Secretary S. C. R. A. '37, '38 

Chorus 

English Club 

Spanish Club 

Alpha Lambda Delta 

Chairman of Recreation S. C. 

R. A. '40 

Ministerial Association 

Secretary of Ministerial Asso- 
ciation '40 

Student Assistant in English 
'38, '39, '40 

Alpha Chi 



HOWELL GADDY 

LAMPASAS 

Major: Chemistry 

Band 

Kappa Alpha 

German Club 



ROWLAND HOLBERT 

GRANGER 

Major: Chemistry 
Pan American Forum 
Phi Delta Theta 

Chaplin 

Treasurer 
Student Senate 



CHARLES INGRAM 

GALVESTON 

Major: Business Ad. 

Football Letterman '38, '39, '40 

Band '38, '39 

Mood Hall Honor Council 

Student Senate '39, '40 

Vice-President Senior Class 

Phi Delta Theta 



HELEN JUBY 

BRIGGS 

Major: Elementary Education 

Chorus 

Sports Club 

Mask and Wig 

Library Staff 

Pan American Forum 



GEORGE FOSTER 

CALVERT 

Major: Business Ad. 
President Alpha Chi '40 
Vice-President University Honor 

Council '39 
Vice-President Spanish Club '39 
President Sophomore Class 
Varsity Debate '38, '39 
Student Senate '38, '39, '40 
Business Manager Magazine '39 
Business Manager Sou'Wester 

'40 
Barb Executive Council '39, '40 
Varsity Basketball Letterman 

'37, '38, '39, '40 
Pi Kappa Delta 
President Mask and Wig '39 
Business Manager Mask and 

Wig '40 
Mood Hall Honor Council '38 
Yell Leader '38, '39, '40 
National Collegiate Players 
Intramural Boxing Champ '39 

„ ' 40 

"S" Association 



WILLIAM GODBEY 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: Chemistry and 

Mathematics 
Science Society 
Texas Academy of Science 
"S" Association 
Tutor in Chemistry 
Varsity Golf '38, '39, '40 



TOMMYE HOUSTON 

ODEM 

Major: Piano and Public School 

Music 
Pi Gamma Mu 
Mozart Society 
Fairie Queen Club 
Pianist's Club 
Chapel Pianist '40 
Pan American Forum 
Orchestra Pianist '39 
Physical Training Assistant 
Student Assistant in Piano 



WILLIAM JOHNSTON 

TEMPLE 

Major: Bible and Religious 

Education 
German Club 
Ministerial Association 

Vice-President '38, '39, '40 



ROBERT AYERS KNIGHT 

SAN ANTONIO 

Major: History 
Football Letterman '37, 

'40 
Track Letterman '39, '40 
"S" Association 
Sport's Club 
Intramural Boxing Champ '40 




GRADUATES 



SETH WARD LEHMBERG 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: Chemistry 

Biology Tutor '40 

University Honor Council '40 

Science Society '40 

German Club 

Lightweight Boxing Champ '39 



JOHN McCOOK 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: Business Ad. 
Kappa Alpha 
Golf '38, '39, '40 
"S" Association 
Pan-American Forum 



JOHN McKINNON 

LONGVIEW 

Major: Chemistry 
Phi Delta Theta 

Chaplain 
Track '37, '38 
German Club 
Biology Tutor 



PAT MANFORD 

SMILEY 

Major: Business Ad. 

Kappa Sigma 

Grand Master '39, '40 
Grand Conclave Delegate 

Vice-President of Students' 
Association '39 

President of Students' Asso- 
ciation '40 

Representative to Texas Stu- 
dent Government Congress 

President of Pan Hellenic 

Mask and Wig 

Arts Club 

President Senior Class 

Philosophy Club '39 

All Intramural Football 



LAURENCE MORGAN 

WACO 

Major: Business Ad. 

Pi Gamma Mu 

Mood Hall Honor Council 




CELIA LITTLE 

LAREDO 

Major: Speech 
Pan-American Forum 



GRACE McKINNEY 

WORTHAM 

Major: English 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

President '39 

Secretary '38 
English Club 
Sigma Tau Delta 
Pi Gamma Mu 

Secretary '40 
Pan-American Forum 
Women's Bldg. Honor Council 
Student Senate 
Secretary Junior Class '39 
Secretary Senior Class '40 
Mask and Wig 
Most Popular Girl '40 



PHIL MAGEE 

ROBSTOWN 

Major: Business Ad. 

Phi Delta Theta 

"S" Association 

Football 

Mask and Wig 

"30" Club 

Student Senate 



JOHN L. MORELLE 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: Business Ad. 
Phi Delta Theta 
Fand '37, '38 
Spanish Club '37, '38 
Mask and Wig 



HENRY T. MYERS 

GLEN FLORA 

Major: History 

Kappa Alpha 

President Sophomore Class '37 

Senate '40 

Sigma Tau Delta 

"S" Association 

Basketball '37, '38, '39, '40 

Track '38, '39, '40 

Mask and Wig 

Editor Southwestern Magazine 

'39, '40 
Assistant Editor Sou'Wester '38 
Chorus '39 




GRADUATES 




VERNON MYERS 

MATHIS 

Major: Business Ad. 

Kappa Alpha 

Philo. Club '37, '38 

American Student Union '37, '38 

Chorus '38 

Track 

Intramural Boxing '39 



ALSON PECK 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: Mathematics 
Science Society 
German Club 
Physics Dept. Tutor 
Alpha Chi 



WALTER PRESLEY 

EL CAMPO 

Major: Chemistry 

Kappa Sigma 

German Club 

Pres. Freshman Class '38 

Pres. Sophomore Class '39 



ROB RENTFRO 

WACO 

Major: English 

Phi Delta Theta, President ': 
Sec. '39, '40 

Alpha Chi 

Sigma Tau Delta, Vice-Presi- 
dent '39, '40 

Pan-American Forum 

Mask and Wig 

Business Manager of South- 
western Magazine, '40 

Member of Student Senate 

Varsity Golf 



'4Q 



MILTON HARVEY 
ROBINSON 

EL PASO 

Major: English 

Pi Kappa Delta '38, '39, '40 

Pi Gamma Mu '39, Pres. '40 

Sigma Tau Delta '39, '40 

S U Band '37, '38 

Senate '38, '39, '40 

Bus. Mgr. The Megaphone '39, 

'40 
S U Chorus, '39, '40 
Alpha Chi 

Pan-American Forum, Pres. 
Who's Who 
Mask and Wig 
American Student Union 
Philosophy Club 
Snyder Hall Honor Council 
University Sunday School Class 

Vice-Pres. '40 
S U Bindery '37, '38 
Assistant Editor Sou'wester '38 



EVANGELINE 
PATTERSON 

GEORGETOWN 

Major: Elementary Education 
Alpha Delta Pi 
German Club 
Sports Club 



'38 



'37 



GILBERT PITTS 

SAN BENITO 

Major: History and Government 
Mood Hall Honor Council 

'39, '40 

Pres. '40 
University Honor Council 

'39, '40 
Megaphone Staff '39 
Ministerial Association 

Pres. '40 
Senate '39, '40 
Barb Exec. Committee '40 
Barb Athletic Director '39 
Bindery Foreman '38, '39, '40 
Pi Gamma Mu 



PAUL REED 

HOLLAND 

Major: Business Ad. 
Intramural Football 
Kappa Alpha 



G. A. RICHTER 

TAYLOR 

Major: Business Ad. 
German Club 
Philosophy Club 
Mask and Wig 
Arts Club 



ED STANFORD 

FORT WORTH 

Major: Government 

Band '37, '38 

Chorus '39, '40 

Varsity Debate '37, '38, '39, '40 

Editor Megaphone '39, 

Pres. Sr. Class '40 

Student Senate '38, '39 

Mood Hall Honor Council '38 

Pi Kappa Delta 

Sigma Tau Delta 

Pi Gamma Mu 

Pres. Kappa Alpha 

Who's Who 

Alpha Chi 



'39, 
'40 



'40 




GRADUATES 



BERNICE STERLING 

GALVESTON 

Major: Elementary Education 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Historian '40 
Pep Squad '37 
Pan-American Forum 
Mask and Wig 



WILL HOUSTON 
TINSLEY 

GONZALES 

Major: Chemistry 
Kappa Alpha 
Alpha Chi 

Vice-Pres. 
S. U. Science Society 
German Club 
Student Senate '38, '39 
Chorus 

Pres. '39, '40 
S. C. R. A. 

Vice-Pres. '40 
Honor Council 

Vice-Pres. '40 
Who's Who 
Student Asst. Chemistry 



BETTY RUTH WELCH 

GROESBECK 

Major: History 

Mask and Wig 

Pres. Tri Delta '40 

Women's Bldg. Honor Council 



SARA MALCOLM 
WRIGHT. R. N. 

BOSTWICK, GEORGIA 

Major: Elementary Education 
School Nurse 



JAMES WYLLIE 

BEAUMONT 

Major: Chemistry 

Kappa Alpha 

Assistant Editor Megaphone '40 




LESLIE THOMPSON 

KATY 

Major: Voice 

Chorus '37, '38, '39, '40 

S. C. R. A. '40 



MARY WARDLAW 

DEL RIO 

Major: Business Ad. 
Tri Delta 

Vice-Pres. '39 
Secretary Sophomore Class '38 
Vice-Pres. Junior Class '39 
Women's Bldg. Honor Council 

Secretary '39, '40 
Student Senate '39 
Rainbow Girl '40 
Pan-American Forum 



HAZLE WOOD 

RIO GRANDE CITY 

Major: History 
Alpa Delta Pi 

Vice-Pres. '39 

Pledge Captain '39 

Chaplain '40 
Women's Bldg. Honor Council 

'39, '40 
Student Senate '40 
Pep Squad '38 
Pi Gamma Mu 
Pan-American Forum 
Mask and Wig 
Art Club 



HELEN WUNDERLE 

PORT ARTHUR 

Major: Public School Music 
Alpha Delta Pi 
Pan-American Forum 
Pianist Club 
Chorus 




JUNIORS 




ADKINS. LILLIAN— Port Arthur 

ALLEN, JACK— Gustine 

ANDERSON, HAL— Conroe 



ANDERSON, MARY— Houston 



BARR, ALLEN Sherman 



BARR, ALLENE— Sherman 



BARTON. THEODORE— Granger 



BETTS, FLOYD, JR.— Wharton 



BLAND, ROY— Taylor 



BRISCOE. BETH— Grandview 



CHAPMAN. DELOUISE— San Angela 



CREWS, FRANKLIN— Wharton 



DALLAS, JEAN— Houston 



DOAN, LEWIS— Humble 



DOZIER, BETTY— Menard 




JUNIORS 






FISHER. FLO— Liberty 



HARRIS. A. G.— Georgetown 



HARRIS, ED. J.— Gilmer 



HARRISON. ELIZABETH— Houston 



HAUN. TOPPIE— Lockhort 



HAYS. BILLIE DORIS— Taylor 



HENDERSON. MARVIN— Georgetown 

HOTCHKISS. JAMES— Jacksonville 

HULL. MARGARET— San Antonio 



HUTCHINSON. MONROE— Houston 



JOHNSTON. JEAN— Georgetown 



KEY. LAURA NELL— Charlotte 



OGAN. EMMA LOU— Sonora 



McCOOK. WOODRUFF— Georgetown 



McKAY. DORIS— Houston 











JUNIORS 




McMURRAY. ROBERT LEE— Yoakum 



MAAS. FRANCES— Clarksville 



MEYER. HENRY W.— Georgetown 



MITCHELL, MARY LOUISE— Rocksprings 



MOOD, ROGER— Georgetown 



NIXON, FRANCES— Muskogee, Okla. 



O'NEILL, FRANK— Yoakum 



OWENS, HORACE— Palestine 



PEEBLES, BYRON— Thorndale 



PEEL, LESTER— Montgomery 



RICHARDSON, MARY LANIER— Georgetown 



ROBERTS, WILMA— Georgetown 



ROBINSON, MARVIN— Spring 



RODGERS, FLOYD— Bastrop 




ROITSCH. C. A.— La Grange" 



JUNIORS 



RADER. PAULINE— Florence 



SCHMURR. GLADYS— Houston 



SHAW, OLA NAN— Troup 



SHIVERS. EFFIE— Crockett 



SNEED. JOSEPH TYREE— Calvert 



STANDRIDGE, DOROTHY— Pendleton 



TRAINER. REGINALD— Sonora 



WALSH. JUNE— Round Rock 



WASSON. ELIZABETH— Buffalo 



WEAVER. NEVIN— Navasota 



WHITCOMB. MARY JANE— Mexia 



WILKINSON. HELEN— Lufkin 



LLIAMS, M. A.— Austin 



WITT, MARY SUE— Georgetown 




WOLFE. TOM— Hico 




SOPHOMORES 




ANDERSON. GRADY— Georgetown 

ASKEY. FRANCES— Gonzales 

BARR. GENEVIEVE— Sherman 

BARTLETT. ELIZABETH— Marlin 

BARTON, ROBERT— Mission 

BEHELER. VERNON— Lufkin 

BENOLD, MAXINE— Georgetown 

BERGIN, JAMES— Georgetown 

BOWERS, ROBERT— Caldwell 

BRACEY, HELEN LOUISE— Bellville 

BRANTLY, GUY— Del Rio 

BRITT. GENEVIEVE— Wheeler 

BROWN, WILLIAM— Harlingen 

BURLESON. JOHN— Smithville 

CAMPBELL. JACK— Marlin 

CARAWAY. MARY ELIZABETH— Houston 

CARLSON. MARY LOUISE— Georgetown 

CATES, DERRILL LEE— Lufkin 

COFFEE, EUNICE— Georgetown 

COLEMAN, LILY LANE— Houston 

COX. SAM— Mexic 




SOPHOMORES 



CRISWELL, GLADINE— Georgetown 

CROWLEY. CLEM— Kerens 

DAVIS. FRANCES— Sherman 

DAVIS. LEONARD— Rocksprings 

DOORNBUS. EMMA— Nederland 

DUNSON. WAYNE— Waco 

EDWARDS, KIRKLAND— Navasota 

ELROD. HORACE— Houston 

ERWIN, ROY— Calvert 

FISHER. MARJORIE— Houston 

FORSVALL, DORIS MARIE— Georgetown 

GLOVER. L. G.. JR.— Georgetown 

GODBEY. ROSALEE— Georgetown 

GOLD. HARRY LEE— Georgetown 

GORDON. CHARLES— Georgetown 

GREEN. KATHERINE— Waco 

HAINLINE. CHARLES— Mt. Sterling 

HARMON. ELIZABETH— Orange 

/HARRISON. FLOY— Jarrell 

HAWKER. GLORIA— Teague 

HODGES. DORIS— Jourdanton 








SDPHDMDRES 




ftaiM-'tfifti 




HODGES, ELIZABETH— Jourdanton 

HOLMES, SAM— Troup 

HOYT. RAE— Katy 

HUNT. MYRA LOU— Portland 

HUTCHERSON, WYNONA— Sonora 

KARR, LEE— Port Arthur 

KINSEL. ROBERT— Hebbronville 

LAMPERT, MARVIN— Lorena 

LAWHON, BILLIE MARIE— Sealy 

LAWLER, RAY— Burkbumett 

LEE, C. L.— Tyler 

LEWIS, BETTE— Houston 

LIGHTHALL, MARION— Beaumont 

LOTT, MICKEY— Trinity 

LUTHER, ELIZABETH— Mathis 

McCALL, SARA— Temple 

McDONALD, JAMES-— Coleman 

McKINNON, ELIZABETH— Longview 

McLENDON, DOUGLAS— Cisco 

McLEOD, GORDON— Happy 
McPHAIL, CHARLES LEE— New London 1 




SOPHOMORES 



MABRY, MARY GENE— Houston 

MacBLAIN, AUDREY— Dallas 

MADELY, BILLIE SUE— Conroe 

MARQUART, W. C— Houston 

MARTIN, RUTH CHRISTINE— Lakeland, Florida 

MASON. ERNEST— Uvalde 

MINTS, MARGERY— Gonzales 

MITCHELL, DAN D.— Gilmer 

MOORE, BILLY— Austin 

MUECKE, WESLEY— Seabrook 

NALL, MARTHA ANN— Georgetown 

NEAL, MARY TOM— Concan 

O'BRIANT, HARVEY LEE— Palestine 

PERRY, MILTON— San Saba 

PIEPER, ALICE— Georgetown 

POWELL, CHARLEY— San Antonio 

POWELL, PAUL— Woodville 

PRICE, JAMES CULLEN— Georgetown 



UGGS, WALTER— Yoakum 

ROE, GRADY CECIL— Winters 

ROGERS, GOODVIN— Palestine 





SOPHOMORES 







RUNDELL, IDA MAY— Houston 

SAUNDERS. WARNER— Coleman 

SCHULZE. CLINTON— Mason 

SEHON. FRANK— Conroe 

SMITH. CHARLES— Georgetown 
SMITH. DENTON— Merryville, Louisiana 

SMITH. NETTA JANE— Waco 

SMITH. WILLIAM GREENE— Houston 

STONE. WINNIE— Georgetown 

STRANGE, LESLIE— Mart 

TAYLOR. WALTER— Orange 

THOMSON. JANE— Gatesville 

TUCKER. EMILY— Galveston 

WEAVER. LYNETTE— Navasota 

WHITE. VERNON— Thrall 

WILCOX, VITULA— Georgetown 

WILKINSON. GLADYS— Lufkin 

WILLIAMS. ALBERT— Georgetown 

WILSON, EDWARD— Holland 

WINFREY. WANDA— Georgetown 

WITHERS, FRANCES— Orange' 




FRESHMEN 



ALBURTIS. LORRAINE— Marlin 

ALLEN, JAMES— Corsicana 

ANDERSON, THOMAS— Kilgore 



AMSLER, ELIZABETH— Houston 

ARMSBY, ELIZABETH— Houston 

AZWELL, RUTH— Port Arthur 



BAGGETT, POSEY— Ozona 

BAKER, JANE— Mathis 

BANCROFT, EDWIN— Powell 



BANDO, NANCY— Waco 

BARTLETT, MARIE— Lufkin 

BARTLEY, LURLINE— Georgetown 



BARTON, DANIEL— Granger 

BIEBERSTEIN, PAUL— Galena Park 

BILHARTZ, HARRELL— Breckenridge 



JIRKELBACH, CHESLEY— Cameron 

BISHOP, MARTHA LOU— Marfa 

BLALOCK. JESSE— Marshall 





FRESHMEN 




BLANTON. MARY SUE— Sonorct 

BOOTHE. JO LEA— Gonzales 

BOWMAN, MARGARET— Sanderson 



BRADY. MATHILDA— Round Rock 

BRIGMAN, FRED— Uvalde 

BRILEY, MARY JOE— Mexia 



BROCKETTE. MARY RUTH— Holland 

BROWN. BOB MARIAN— Portland 

BROWN. DOUGLASS— Slaton 



BRUMLEY, L. A.— Del Rio 

BURGIN. HELEN— Hondo 

BURRUS. EUGENE— Beaumont 



CARTER. MITTIE SUE— Conroe 

CARTWRIGHT. HOLMAN— San Augustine 

CASWELL. ARNOLD— Georgetown 



CLARK. RODNEY— Alice 

CLUCK. JOHN— Georgetown 

COBB. ALBERT— Calverr 




FRESHMEN 



COBB, SAM— Calvert 

COLBERT, JAMES— Granger 

COMAN, JACK— Mexia 



COOKE, EVELYN— Georgetown 

COOKE, JOHN BUNYAN— Llano 

COREY, JACQUELINE— Houston 



COX, ISAAC— Lufkin 

CROW, VIRGINIA— Port Arthur 

DANIELS, LORIECE— Houston 



DAVIS. ERNEST— Kosse 

DAWSON, ROGER— Georgetown 

DENSON, JEWEL— Granger 



DODD. DAVID— Malakoff 

DURST. LILLIAN— Art 

DYESS, HUBERT— Heame 



■ AGLE, DOROTHY— Lufkin 

EDWARDS, DAIN— Smithville 

ESTES, JOHN— Smithville 





FRESHMEN 




FANNIN, RAY— Madisonville 

FLANAGAN. ELIZABETH— Georgetown 

FLY, FRANCIS RUTH— Hondo 



GIPSON, ELWYN— Lufkin 

GLENN, GERRY— Lufkin 

GORDON, WELDON— Georgetown 



GRAY, PHILLIP— Palestine 

GREGG, NEWTON DEWITT— Kingsbury 

GUNN. OLLIE— Troy 



HARRIS, MAXINE— Gilmer 

HAUSENFLUCK, JESSE— Georgetown 

HEARD, DOROTHY— Georgetown 



HEDGE, KATHRYN— Henderson 

HENDERSON, VIRGINIA— Jasper 

HILLEGEIST, DOROTHY— Lexington 



HORN, KATHLEEN— Smithville 

HORNE, ELSIE WAYNE— Wellington 

HOSKINSON, BARBARA— Taf 




FRESHMEN 



HUGHES, MARY LOUISE— Woodville 
HYER, AGNES— Fort Worth 

JACKSON. LESTER— El Paso 



JENNINGS, BRUCE ALLEN— Houston 

JOHNSON, MAURINE— Dallas 

JOHNSTON, HARRY— Georgetown 



KILGORE, DANA— Malakoff 

LAUGHLIN, BERNICE— Houston 

LEA, GEORGE Orange 



LOKEY, MARY— Marlin 

McCALL. JOHN WILL— Jasper 

McGUIRE, FA YE— Orange 



McLANE. ERNEST— Lufkin 

McPHAIL, DOROTHY— New London 

MANFORD. MILLER— Smiley 



(MANN. LOUELLA— Brady 

MAXWELL, ALICE ANN— Coleman 

MAY. ETALKA— Georgetown 








FRESHMEN 







.>.t 



MAY, LAURA KUYKENDALL— Georgetown 
MEDLENKA. CLYDA MAE— Houston 

MEDLENKA. MARJORY NELL— Houston 



MELBERT, JAMES— Port Arthur 

MEREDITH. C. SPENCER— Calvert 

MERRIMAN, BETTY JEAN— Hondo 



MEYER, RODNEY— Georgetown 

MICKLE, NAN— Eastland 

MILLER, PAUL— Longview 



MIMS, JOE— Palestine 

MINTER. ANNA— Gonzales 

MITCHELL, ARVIN— Ben Arnold 



MOORE. ELEANOR— Oakwood 

MOORE, PEGGY NELL— Palestine 

MORROW, ESTA FAYE— Crockett 



MOTE, DOROTHY SUE— Lorena 

PAYNE. WILLIAM B.— Malakoff 

PECK, CHARLES R.— Georgetown 




FRESHMEN 



PHILLIPS. JAMES ROBERT— San Augustine 
PITTS. JULIAN— Conroe 
REPSCHLEGER. BILLIE MAE— Port Arthur 



RHODES. ABB, JR.— Georgetown 

RIDGWAY. THOMAS— Yoakum 

ROBBINS. JANE— Georgetown 



ROBERSON. FREDRICKA— Fort Worth 

ROBINSON. MARY DUKE— Killeen 

ROLSTON. ROSEMARY E.— Lufkin 



RUNNELS. VERNON— Humble 

SANDHERR. MARGARET Sonora 

SANFORD. THOMAS K.— Houston 



SCHILLING. MEL VIN— Garwood 

SHAW. CHARLES. JR.— Georgetown 

SIDES. HOWARD— Granger 



5MITH, HAZEL RAE— Woodsboro 

SOUTHWELL. SAM— Tomball 
STANALAND. MAX EDGAR— Palestine 





FRESHMEN 




STONE, C. M.— Houston 

TERRY, MARGORY ANN— Lufkin 

TITSWORTH, JACQUELINE— Taylor 

TORBETT. JOY— Marlin 

TRAMMELL, MARY LEE— Georgetown 

TYREE, JEANNE— Wharton 

TYSON. SAMUEL— Cameron 

WALDEN. LA VERNE— Crockett 

WILLIAMS, ZELLA— Lufkin 

WARNKE, MARGARET— San Antonio 

WELCH, MARGORIE— Lufkin 

WETZEL, CORINE— Freeport 

WHITLEY, JUANITA— Gonzales 

WALKUP. MARIAN— Mexia 

WILSON, ERNESTINE— Marshall 



WISE, MARTHA ANN— Galveston 

WOOD. BERTHA— Houston 

WOOD, JANE— Longview 

WRIGHT. ROBERT— Vernon 

WYATT, COLLEEN— Beaumont 

WYCHE. VIRGINIA LEE— Temple 




SECOND SEMESTER STUDENTS 



THOMPSON, DeEDRA— Tyler IV 

LIESE, CARL— Georgetown IV 

COLE. OLIVER— Sterling City IV 

CAMPBELL. ISABELLE— Spur III 

GRIEGER. JOYCE ELAINE— Mt. Clemens, Mich. Ill 
CONOLEY. GILBERT— Taylor III 

CONOLEY. GILLIS— Taylor III 

COGDELL. JONISUE— Snyder II 



SHERRILL, DOUGLAS— Houston II 

WALTERS. BYRON— Brownsville II 

BIELSTEIN, JEAN— New Braunfels I 

BLACK. ELIZABETH— Georgetown I 

CATES. DORIS— Georgetown I 
DeVILBISS. EDITH— Taft I 

DOZIER. PRICE— Breckenridge I 

EPPS, REBECCA— Colorado City I 

GALBREATH. HELEN ONETA— Georgetown I 
HOLLAND. EVANS— Happy I 

KNIGHT. THOMAS— Round Rock II 

KUNKEL. ELRO— Brenham II 



MURRAY. FRANCES— Crockett I 

PITTMAN. HELEN— Donna I 

POPE, ROBERT— Hondo I 

QUINN. PATRICIA— Houston I 

ROQUEMORE. FRED— Palestine I 

SCARBOROUGH, CHARLES— Dallas I 
SMITH. BURLEIGH— Hondo I 

STEPHENSON, WARD— Orange II 

TERRELL. BETTY— Eagle Lake I 

WATTS. HOWARD VAN. JR.— Beaumont III 
WILLIAMS. JOE DAVID— Ozona I 

WOLF. CAB— Clarksville I 















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• • 



MISS MARJORIE FISHER 

Miss Southwestern 

MISS GRACE McKINNEY 

Most Popular Girl 

MISS HELEN LOUISE BRACEY 

Most Ideal Girl 

MISS EFFIE SHIVERS 

Delta Delta Delta 

MISS ALLENE BARR 

Zeta Tau Alpha 

MISS DOROTHY STANDRIDGE 

Barb Association 

MISS ELIZABETH ANN McKINNON 

Alpha Delta Phi 

MISS MARY WARDLAW 

Rainbow Girl 







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IRATES 







» 



By DERRILL LEE CATES 

Although the Southwestern University Pirates 
of 1939 won but half of their Texas Conference 
gumes they definitely have one victory that 
stands alone. 

Stricken by the death of 

Lefty Edens and handi- 

capped by having to learn 

a new type of football in a 

score of days, the Corsairs, 

nevertheless, s 1 a u g h t ered 

A ^ the Abilene Christian Wild- 

■ \ cats in their own back yard 

' "- * • * 26-7 — a feat which no other 

MILTON PERRY 

Team Manager 




^^^1^ 



5' >%* 






J i 




team in this conference was able to accom- 
plish. 

In the opening game of the season Med 
Medley carried his Bucs to Waco for their 
"money tilt" with Morley Jennings' Baylor 
Bears. With Jack Wilson and Jimmy Witt 




BILLY SMITH 



YELL LEADERS 

FREDDIE ROBERSON 



GEORGE FOSTER 





operating behind a heavy Bear line the 
score went 33-0 in favor of the Southwest 
Conference team. Dutch O'Neil raced 50 
yards after taking a twenty - yard pass 
from Tossin' Ted Fehr for the Pirates' 
major offensive threat. Fehr outpassed 
the Baylor chunkers, but the final spark 
was missing from the Pirate eleven. 



TOSSIN" TED FEHR 

3 letter, back 




1 



CLEM CROWLEY GUY BRANTLEY 

1 letter, back 2 letter, back 



WALTER RIGGS 

2 letter, guard 







BUBBA HARRIS 

2 letter, guard 



?■•■* 




On Synder Field a week later the Cru- 
saders fro .Ti St. Edwards University spoiled 
a homecoming celebration by downing the 
Pirates 13-0 in the first conference en- 
counter for both elevens. In this sad 
tussle the Pirates seemed jittery and 
again lacked the final push. An unex- 
pected 35 - yard pass into the arms of 
Bobby Jens proved enough for a touch- 
down and victory for the Austin team. 




DUTCH O'NEIL 

2 letter, back 





OBERT McMURREY 

2 letter, guard 



BOB KNIGHT 

4 letter, back 



JACK ALLEN 

4 letter, guard 



CHARLIE INGRAM 

3 letter, tackle 



The last non-conference game watched 
the Southwest Texas Teachers run past the 
Pirates for a 12-2 decision. A determined 
crew of Bucs outgained and pushed inside 
the Bobcat ten-yard stripe on three occa- 
sions only to see the ball go over on fum- 



bles and downs. Big Charlie Ingram and 
Lewis Doan smothered Halfback Lomax in 
the final guarter for the Pirates' counter. 

Days later a new kind of team forged 
into Abilene and showed 8000 West Texans 
the real "razzle dazzle" football. The 




: ;,*■;■?:■■ .: 




'* 





LEWIS DOAN 

3 letter, end 



HORACE ELROD 

1 letter, end 



CY RODGERS 

3 letter, end 



MACK DAVENPORT 

2 letter, end 




CHARLIE POWELL 

1 letter, tackle 



JOHN BURLESON 

2 letter, back 



LESTER BRUMLEY 

1 letter, tackle 



MARVIN LAMPERT 

1 letter, tackle 




* ll » 




Christians pushed over a touchdown in the 
second quarter, but that was all as the 
Medleymen started playing a new brand 
of football. Minutes before the half Bob 
Wright pitched a pass to Clem Crowley, 
who raced 50 yards for a marker. Early in 



the third period Cy Rodgers clamped to 
one of Fehr's tosses for another score. Bob 
Wright threw a pass to Slick Elrod, who 
lateraled to C. L. Lee, for the third counter. 
With five minutes to go in the final period, 
Bob (Beartracks) Knight intercepted a 






M 

■■■■■:■• 



C. L. LEE 

2 letter, back 



Wildcat heave and splashed his way for 
45 yards and another marker. 

This slaughter by the Pirates proved to 
be the only flaw on the Christians' sched- 
ule. The Wildcats went on to be co-cham- 
pions with the St. Edwards Crusaders. 




If MF& 



CLARENCE ROESTCH 

1 letter, back 







GILBERT CONOLEY 

1 letter, center 



DOUGLASS McLENDON 

Squad, end 



EDWIN BANCROFT 

Squad, end 



rn^M 





//*- 



«l 




An inspired crew of Corsairs boarded a 
special train with hundreds of students, but 
fell from the conference race on that freez- 
ing night with three minutes to play as a 
Trinity passer connected with a 50-yard 
oval pitch. The Pirates succumbed 13-7. 




LUTHER CHRISTMAN 

1 letter, guard 




The following week 
Coach Medley received 
some satisfaction as the 
Pirates defeated his former 
footballers — the McMurry 
Indians — on soggy, rain- 
soaked Snyder, 12-0. Dutch 
O'Neil engineered a muddy 
92-yard drive for a marker 
in the initial guarter for a 
touchdown, and Guy Brant- 
ley added another with 035- 
yard run during the last pe- 
riod. 

On to Brownwood and the 






Bucs duplicated their Mc- 
Murry victory at the ex- 
pense of the Daniel Baker 
Hillbillies, only team to de- 
feat the co-champion Cru- 
saders. In this tussle Knight 
probably played the best 
game of his career by mak- 
ing a touchdown and rip- 
ping a Billie forward wall to 
bits. 

The Pirates closed the sea- 
son hereby bowing to the 
Howard Payne Yellowjac- 
kets in a thrilling 6-0 game. 





BASKETBALL 




GEORGE FOSTER 










4 letter, forward 










CLARENCE ROITSCH 








Squad, 


guard 








VERNON RUNNELS 






1 letter 


forward 










MARVIN LAMPERT 










Squad, guard 










LEWIS DOAN 








1 letter. 


guard 










HENRY MYERS 








3 letter. 


forward 




BASKETBALL 



CHARLES SMITH 

Squad, guard 



BRUCE JENNINGS 

Squad, guard 



EDWIN BANCROFT 

1 letter, center 



HORACE ELROD 

2 letter, forward 



BOB WRIGHT 

Squad, center 






S" ASSOCIATION 



FOOTBALL 



"Bud" Bremer 
"Jake" Powell 
Charlie Ingram 
Cy Rodgers 
"Mac" Davenport 
Lewis Doan 
Jack Allen 
Walt Riggs 
"Bubbie" Harris 
Robert McMurrey 
Ted Fehr 
"Dutch" O'Neil 



Bob Knight 
Guy Brantley 
"Bulldog" Crowley 
"Butch" Roitsch 
C. L. Lee 
Bob Wright 
Gilbert Conoley 
"Slick" Elrod 
"Cris" Christman 
Marvin Lampert 
"Red" Taylor 
"Bo" Brumley 



BASKETBALL 



George Foster 
Mac Davenport 
"Slick" Elrod 



"Monk" Meyers 
Vernon Runnels 
Edwin Bancroft 



Lewis Doan 



GOLF 



Bill Godbey 
Johnny McCook 



Woody McCook 
Bob Rentfro 



YELL LEADEBS 



George Foster 



Billy Smith 



FOOTBALL MANAGEB 



Woody McCook 



Milton Perry 





* i » ■ • * t > 

'wSa 

• ... .- 





eatureS 




Mac and Dan take at least a 
footbath . . . Mmmm, yeah, but 
who protects the girruls? . . . 
Sunday s(n)acks . . . Got a 
specimen, Weaver? . . . Three 
gentlemen at leisure . . . Watta- 
man, wattasmile . . . The age 
of innocence . . . Snapper snap- 
ped while snapping . . . How's 
the glare, Lady Astor? . . . 
Chums from way back, Ernes- 
tine and Dorothy . . . Titsworth 
appears suspicious . . . Infantry- 
make front and flank attack . . . 
Three emptyhanded sportsmen 
grin . . . Torbett sure does blow 
a lot . . . Boy with hand in 
pocket — Brown. 



Snow seens on first day of 
exams, remember? Three little 
pigs ... He's at it again, Kath- 
leen . . . Hull prefers dental 
floss, no doubt . . . Jo-eds and 
co-eds reconnoiter for a snow 
fight . . . Cossacks Walden and 
Hutcherson stay out of trouble 
. . . Snowed under . . . "Ay tank 
ay go down," said the little 
drip . . . Bohmfalk is indifferent 
to Tommy's throwing snow in 
Mittie Sue's face . . . Logan, "I 
love you snow!", Blanton, "Oh, 
is that snow?" . . . Some Crosely 
boys sign out . . . Melbert, how's 
the snow blanket? Thompson 
seems intent on a bit of snow 
baptism . . . Somebody is down 
on this cool reception business 
. . . Not very tough sledding is 
it, Mac? 



ijfaiJ"' 





■,& . "^MWMKTW^ 1 


WjS 


Wm*m Wl ' 


ft 




» 


Jj^Bk^jj^^P^K^BJp mmi., . JH ' 





Two's company, three's gossip 
(Owen's in the big middle) . . . 
just been signed up on Broadway, 
Jimmy? Sara and Jean enjoy a 
(censored) joke . . . Doesn't that 
K A pin scratch, Goodvin? El 
Presidente . . . Eleanor sits and 
suns . . . Ooooh, Jackson, its June 
in January . . . Elsie and Bailey 
. . . Betts seems worried by that 
rock in Joy's shoe . . . Miss Demure 
charms us from a lawn chair pose 
. . . Looks like a Tri-Delt smile con- 
test . . . Helen takes a "campus 
cutie" shot. 



Everybody happy? Cowgirl . . . 
Gaddy toots his own horn . . . 
Mary Joe and Evelyn demonstrate 
how they would like to have done 
. . . What, no line busy? 1940, 
and Southwestern rides high in 
the big parade . . . Johnson's 
hands work the streets . . . Just 
a brother-sister act . . . Hold (the 
gun) tight! El Presidente will now 
show how to throw a curve . . . 
Lillian, is that you smiling and 
turning up your nose too? Awww, 
shuckins, Billy . . . Closeups of 
Johnson's crew . . . Munson poses 
primly . . . Take a letter, Miss Wise 
. . . Smith is about ready to prac- 
tice . . . The waiters just took on- 
other freezer of ice cream . . . Well 
now, ain't that just something . . . 
Got her shod, Logon? 



Alia, caught in the act, guilty of 
sweeping . . . Love silhouetted 
against winter, er sump'n . . . 
What funny birds you play with, 
Crow . . . Ideal miss, don't you 
think, Brantley? The thinker, of 
monkeybusiness . . . Better fold up 
your thumbs, boys, this isn't the 
celestial railroad . . . Ladies and 
Gents, this is Lee Karr who took 
many of these snapshots, But Not 
YOURS ... "A Stampede of Col- 
lege Humor" . . . Dutch thinks its 
good to be alive . . . The little Del- 
tas weren't all quite ready for 
that one . . . Lismo looks toward 
higher things . . . "Doc" Shulze, 
the man in the plaster cast . . . 
Three sourpusses sat in a row, 
and were they sour ... Is it the 
fog, Beaver? The sports editor has 
been sporting a little . . . These are 
the slopping, racking, washing, 
drying, stacking sons-of-a-gun, the 
society of dishwashers ... In this 
corner we have — . . . Oooh, what 
a muscle! Three Zeta smile girls. 



What's in that bottle Tommy? . . . 
Gene Burrus views the campus 
from his perch . . . No politicing 
around the polls, boys . . . This 
next one must have been taken 
during chapel . . . Campus two- 
somes ■ — Helen and Vernon — 
Charlie, three is a crowd! . . . Har- 
mon and Wright. Bull session in 
front of the Tavern. 





Pictures of our visitors from 
San Marcos — The train pulls 
in . . . Several views of the 
crowd, and their drum- 
majors. 



Mood Hall, complete with 
snow . . . "It's June in Jan- 
uary" . . . Run on in Tot, 
Frances, Marjorie Jo, and 
Helen, you'll catch your 
death! Judy and Charlie — 
three minutes before class 
. . . He-man Allen . . . Haven't 
you all gone in yet? There, 
that's more sensible . . . 
Corinne, Doris, and Jackie 
. . . Oh, yes, The Library! 
Dorothy and Nancy like it too 
. . . Nettie Jane and Pitts — not 
too far apart. 




Bill McCall enjoys the lazy life 
while his friend next door 
mixes business with pleasure 
. . . Dorothy McPhail, another 
worker, and Spenser Meredith 
. . . Colbert Cleans up the Phi 
back yard — the life of a pledge! 
Evelyn evidently takes her art 
seriously . . . Lawhon and 
Green — the inseparables . . . 
Woody and Gus and Billie Sue 
. . . Ray Fannin enthralls home- 
coming crowds . . . Phil Magee, 
Forrest Jones, and the redoubt- 
able Eddie Warren . . . Fannin, 
Bailey and Powell — you can't 
all get in there. 



Nona Beth exhibits wifely per- 
suasion . . . Hutch and Chris, 
Mary Louise and Eleanor, Beth 
and Margaret . . . Three cute 
ADPI's, Flanagan, Mote, and 
Fisher , . . And Allan usually 
looks so pleasant, too! . . . 
Bergin says, "You see, it's this 
way" . . . Jitterbug and Lorice 
. .. Ed Levitt squires two girls 
. . . Hmm, Genevieve with Mary 
Gene . . . And Sara leans on 
Mac's protecting shoulder . . . 
Goodness, Rosemary and Ams- 
ler . . . One of our new stream- 
lined models, complete with 
running board, steering wheel, 
Phil Gray and Jimmy Wylie 
. . . Amsler beams — maybe 
Levitt is coming in sight . . . 
Zetas — Faye, Btsey, Harmon 
and Beth . . . More people . . . 
Hutch looks downcast . . . Hey, 
Amsler, your mouth's open! 




< 

The special . . . Genevieve and 
Mac, Sara and Allen, just before 
leaving . . . The two Bans and 
Jimmy . . . Sam Holmes looks 
happy but Mary Gene seems to 
have something on her mind . . . 
Sam Holmes maybe? . . . Manford 
amuses Withers, while Buddy and 
Emma Owen look quizzical . . . 
There, Mary Gene, we knew you'd 
feel better in a little while. There's 
a far-away look in Sara's eye . . . 
Buddy and Smitty look more 
cheerful in this picture. 



-> 



We think Sam's going to be a 
gentleman and carry Mary Mar- 
tha's books . . . Milton, Billie 
Doris, and Judy looking a little de- 
pressed . . . Toppie Haun and 
Laddie . . . Smile big, Peggy . . . 
Bergin whispers sweet nothings 
to Doris . . . Another chapel scene 
. . . Jane, Sam, and Mary Martha 
all cheerful . . . Miss Messick 
shepherds her class across from 
the tavern. 




"With The Intramurals" 
By DERRILL LEE CATES 

SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 
is glad to present its intramural 
program started by Director of 
Physical Education, Rhea Wil- 
liams,, in the fall of 1938. 

In this two-year period the for- 
mer Southern Methodist university 
athlete has undoubtedly stamped 
a program here that any school 
would be proud to possess. 

Competition in this show is 
among the organizations through- 
out the campus. The barbs are di- 
vided into two groups which 
makes competition keener and 
more interesting. A Barb "A" team, 
a Barb "B" team, and a team from 
each of the three fraternities — 
Kappa Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, 
and Kappa Sigma, go to make up 
the five organizations listed in 
league competition. 

The setup calls for the four ma- 
jor sports: football, basketball, 
baseball, and track with other 
minor sports being reeled off when 
the majors are not in full swing. 

Points are passed out for first, 
second, and third place winners 
in each sport and the team at the 
end of the school year with the 
most markers is awarded a beau- 
tiful bronze plaque for its achieve- 
ment. 

Last year the Barbs won the 
plaque by eking out the Kappa 
Alpha fraternity in a thrilling finish 
by winning the last major sport — 
track. 

By winning every major sport 
and their share of the minor ones 
thus far the Barb "A" team has 
virtually clinched honors for 1940, 
even should they fail to click in 
the remaining sports. 

Intramural standing without 
baseball, track, and tennis record- 
ed stand in the following order: 



Team 
Barb A 
Barb B 
K. A.'s 
Phis' 
Sigs' 



Points 
530 
250 
235 
195 
40 



Williams with the help of Floyd 
(Cy) Rodgers has founded a two- 
night boxing tournament along 
with the intramural program. 
"SOUTHWESTERN FIGHT NIGHT" 
gives to its winners in each weight 
an engraved golden glove. 

"Besides the fun and getting 
credit for physical education this 
kind of program prepares a boy 
for some of the major problems of 
life," states Williams. 




Mote, Briley, and Brockette . . . 
Rusty doesn't really want to go to 
class . . . Houston and Horn — 
and their pet picture . . . The love- 
bugs, McKinnon and Chapman — 
and there are Harmon and Wright 
again . . . Thweet 'ittle Lollie — 
not waiting for a street car . . . 
Milton and Billie Doris . . . Brant- 
ley, O'Neill, McMurray, and Brum- 
ley reluctantly leave the Woman's 
Building . . . Jane Baker — but 
what is she doing? McPhail and 
Davis take a few more drags be- 
fore they go in. 



Billie Marie and Kathryn . . . 
Harvey's usual beam (he's plan- 
ning to get somebody in trouble, 
no doubt) . . . That's a conservative 
shirt, Buddy . . . Margaret and 
Paul try skipping rocks. Sara and 
Judy, unusually serious . . . And 
Billy Smith looks nonchalant again 
. . . Phil Gray and Jimmie Wylie 
. . . Jimmie Wylie and Margaret 
Hull, Tot, Brantley, Davenport . . . 
Betty and Ted and Jack Allen . . . 
Fannin and Jackie step out . . . 
And there's Horace . . . Phil and 
Pat and Mittie Sue talk things 
over . . . Cheerful souls, Sehon 
and Sam . . . Peggy and Gloria 
and the pause that refreshes. 




Here we have the flag fight, with 
Eoheler in the middle of it . . . 
Phil goes kittenish on us . . . 
What's that in your hand, Jane? 
There, there, Frances — don't take 
it so hard . . . Our most educated 
freshman, Kentucky, listens to a 
lecture . . . Tuck and Gaddy . . . 
More Shoe fight with Gipson and 
Phil Gray doing their bit. 




ctnizcttiond 



ALPHA CHI 



Jll 




Dr. Howard 
Stanford 



Dean Ferguson 

Bremer 

Richardson 



Dr. Wolcott 
Peck 
Weaver 



Foster 
Robinson 
Sneed 



Bailey- 


Childress 


Brown 


Tinsley 


Whitcomb 


Hays 



Ferguson 

Rentfro 

Harmon 



Brannies 
Bohmfalk 



OFFICERS 

President GEORGE FOSTER 

Vice-President WILL TINSLEY 

Secretary JOHN CHILDRESS 

Sponsors DR. HOWARD 

DEAN FERGUSON 
DR. WOLCOTT 



The Alpha Chi is Southwestern's chapter of the national collegiate honor 
society and is the mother chapter of this unit of collegiate scholarship. The 
national convention celebrating the twenty-fifth anniversary of the organiza- 
tion was held at Southwestern University this year. The Alpha Chi seeks to 
stimulate, develop, and recognize scholarship and those elements of character 
which make scholarship effective. Members are elected from the upper tenth 
in scholastic standing of the Junior and Senior Classes. 



SOUTHWESTERN SEIE1VEE SDEIETY 




Dean Ullrich Dr. Godbey Mr. Wapple 

Childress Lehmberg Marquart Brown 

Bilhartz Betts Dr. Wolcott Gordon 



Wilkinson 


Bailey 


Meyer 


Godbey 


Mr. Dunn 


Meredith 


Tinsley 


Brown 


Bohmfalk 


Peck 


Johnston 


Weaver 


Cluck 


Schulze 


Price 



OFFICERS 

President JOHN CHILDRESS 

Secretary JOHN BOHMFALK 



The Southwestern Science Society is an organization of advanced stu- 
dents in the study of various phases of the scientific field. The society is pri- 
marily interested in research and the promotion of greater understanding in 
the components of the Universe. 



PI GAMMA MU 




Liese 


Bland 


Brannies 


Bailey 


Dr. Gray 


Haas 


Hotchkiss 


Pitts 


Morgan 


Wood 


Stanford 


Whitcomb 



Dean Ullrich Mr. Williams 

Houston McKinnon 

Brady Dr. Granberry Robinson 



Richardson Ecles 

Mr. Waggoner Mr. Hester 

McKinney Ferguson 



OFFICERS 

President MILTON ROBINSON 

Secretary GRACE McKINNEY 



Pi Gamma Mu is a national social science honor society whose funda- 
mental aim is to promote extended activity toward the solution of all human 
problems. The organization stresses high scholastic rating and aptitude in the 
fields of the various social sciences. 



MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 




'< -jx: 



Roberts 


Jackson 


Cates 


Cook 


Birkelback 


Clark 


Mitchell 


Cole 


Godbey 


Hotchkiss 


Ferguson 


Davis 


Johnston 


Ferguson 


Doan 


Dunson 


Pitts 


Lawler 



OFFICERS 

President GILBERT PITTS 

Vice-President WILLIAM JOHNSTON 

Secretary LOUISE FERGUSON 



The Ministerial Association is a representative group of young men and 
women who have dedicated their lives to the church and its associated units 
of work. This group has been a material aid in maintaining a Christian atmos- 
phere on the campus. 



MASK MD WIG 




Britt 


Wood 


Merriman 


Pieper 


Briley 


Hughes 


Baggett 


O'Briant 


Hawker 


Walkup 


Brigman 


Brady 


Mood 


Sandherr 


Wilcox 


Bergquist 


Manford 


McKinnon 


Coman 


Cade 


Johnston 


Neal 


Juby 


Hedge 


Roberson 


Smith 


Heard 


Foster 


Sehon 


Hotchkiss 


Hays 


Mr. Marsh 



The Mask and Wig is an organization of students 
interested in dramatic art and in increasing the re- 
sources of Southwestern University in dramatic 
leadership. A select group of the Mask and Wig 
constitute a chapter of the National Collegiate Play- 
ers which gives opportunity for dramatic expression 
to the students of the school. 




MASK AND WIG 







Mote 


Roberts 


Flanagan 


McKinnon 


Johnson 




Bergin 




Wyche 


Richter 


Williams 


Cluck 


Houston 


Torbett 


Maas 




Horn 




Richardson 


Tyree 


Eagle 


Bartlett 


Robbins 


Daniels 


Walden 




Cooke 




Meyer 


Maxwell 


Corey 


Minter 


Terry Boothe 


Logan 




Carter 




Cox 


Lighthall 


Chapman 




OFFICERS 

President JEAN JOHNSTON" 

Vice-President . . . ELIZABETH ANN McKINNON 
Business Manager GEORGE FOSTER 



THE SOUTHWESTERN 




Ccrtes 



Cook Powell Rae Tinsley Knight Botenko Robinson 

Bishop Roberts Hyer Criswell Carlson Brannies Wilkinson Wise 

Fisher Munson Juby Bergin Harris Merriman Richardson Brockett Madame Slaviansky 




MARA SLAVIANSKY 

Accompanist 



The Southwestern Chorus is one of the outstanding 
organizations on the campus. The Chorus has gained 
national recognition through its many concerts given 
in recent years, climaxed with their appearance at 
the National Biennial Convention and Festival of the 



UNIVERSITY CHORUS 




Gross Meyer Stanford Ecles Cox Erwin Dodd Watts 

Adkins Wunderle Walden Maas Lighthall Medelinka Hunt Wetzel Daniels 

Mara Slaviansky Hohlova Godbey Harmon Fly Witt Henderson Hoyt 



Weaver 



National Federation of Music Clubs in May, 1939. 



The Southwestern Chorus was one of the twelve 



choruses in the United States chosen to appear at 



this convention in Baltimore, Maryland. 



MADAME SLAVIANSKY 

Director 




LIBRARY STAFF 




May Durst Roberts Weaver May Lckey Baker McPhail Bowman Carlson Smith Rader Galbreath Harrison Wedemeyer Benold 

Hilligeist Ferguson Armsby Wilson Hoskinson Rundell Epps Henderson Forswell 

Lut h er Bcrtley Cooke Alburtis Lawhon Green Robinson Stone 







Pictures not appearing: 

Brockett, Grieger, Juby, Pieper. 



l<!^o£^>| 



Mrs. Margaret Mood McKinnen, Librarian 
Mary Maude Wedemeyer, Assistant 



SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY BAND 




Mims 
Cooke 



Shaw 
Dawson Estes 

Melbert Coman 

Torbett Dyess 



McDonald Beaver 

Smith Bowers Barton 

Heard Bilhartz Roberson Gaddy 

Bieberstein Stanaland Caswell 



Leavitt 
Campbell 

McLeod 



Allen 



Mrs. Tom Johnson, Soloist 



Tom Johnson, Director 



Betts Cox 

Price Owens 

Williams Miller Titsworth 

Jimmy Hotchkiss, Comedian 



Holmes 
Home 



*^n&* 



The Southwestern University Band under the direction of Tom Johnson 
ranks as one of the outstanding collegiate musical units and annually pre- 
sents its musical extravaganza, The Pigskin Revue, on a state-wide tour. 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 




PAT MANFORD 

President 



LOUIS DOAN 

Vice-President 



RUTH BRANNIES 

Secretary 




The Student Association comprises 
every registered student in Southwest- 
ern University and the Constitution of 
the Association provides for a student 
self-government with executive officers, 
officers of the student publications, and 
the Honor System. The Honor System 
is controlled by the Students' Associa- 
tion and expresses the belief that every 
student is a lady or gentleman and will 
act accordingly during their stay at 
Southwestern University. 



THE STUDENT SENATE 




Manford 


Doan 


Brannies 


Bailey 


Foster 


Stanford 


Jackson 


Wood 


Pitts 


Robinson 


Meyers 


Anderson 


Harris 


Price 


McMurrey 


Sneed 


Campbell 


Barr 


Rentfro 


Weaver 


Lott 


Hays 


Whitcomb 


Ingram 


Powell 


Cook 


Coy 



The Student Senate is the governing body of the Student Association and 
is elected from the four classes and honor councils. Then Senate meets at 
regular intervals and receives reports from various campus organizations. 
The Senate chooses nominees for student offices and regulates student ac- 
tivities. 



PAN AMERICAN FORUM 




Miss Morgan 


Weaver 


Wilcox 


Bartlett 


Gregg 


Home 



Cooke 



Amsler 



Martin Powell Pieper 

Fisher McKinnon Thompson 

Dodd Hedge Hotchkiss 

Wyche Ormsby May 



Elrod Hoyt 

Madley Weaver 

Sandherr Mott 

Hilligeist Jackson 



Cates Peebles 

Nail Payne 

Fly Flanagan 

Hoskinson 






*438&* 



The Pan American Forum is an international organization of students with 
a high average in the study of the Spanish language. The local chapter is 
composed of Spanish students who maintain contacts with South American 
chapters, thereby promoting a better understanding between the Americas. 



LE EERELE FRAIVEAIS 




Robbins 


Wyatt 


Roberson 




Crow 


Hays 


Daniela 




Sides 


Torbett 


Phillips 


Robinson 


Edwards 




Horn 


Brown 


Tyree 




Miller 


Kilgore 


Walden 


Harris 


Eagle 




Maxwell 


Bartlett 


Withers 




Brown 


Lott 


Hodges 


Smith 


Wise 




Erwin 


Wilkinson 


Hodges 




O'Brient 


McLeod 




Ferg 


uson 


Price 




Sehon 


Godbey 


Cad 


e 





OFFICERS 

BILLIE DORIS HAYS President 

JAMES FERGUSON Tutor 

DR. J. H. UTLEY Sponsor 



UNIVERSITY HONOR COUNCIL 




Pitts 
Whitcomb 



Pieper 



Erwin 



Tinsley 



Hays 



Bremer 



Lehmberg 



Doan 



The University Honor Council is a unit of student self-govern- 
ment which has jurisdiction over the actions of the students when 
they are outside the dormitories. This body is chosen from the 
three upper classes and approved by the faculty. 



WOMEN'S RUILDING HONOR COUNCIL 




Lott 
Welch 



Withers 



Briscoe 



Hays 



Ban 



Wardlaw 



Whitcomb 

Wood 



The Women's Building Honor Council is the governing body of 
the girls in the Women's Building and has jurisdiction over the 
actions of all girls residing in the dormitory. 



MDDD HALL HONOR COUNCIL 




Doan 
Ingram 



Morgan 
Bremer 



Harris 
Coy 



Crews 
Pitts 



The Mood Hall Honor Council is the governing body of Mood Hall and 
has jurisdiction over the actions of all boys residing in the men's dormitory. 



,.H3t§EU, 



SIVYHER HALL HONOR COUNCIL 




Perry 



O'Neill 



McMurry 



Brantley 



Rodgers 



The Snyder Hall Honor Council enforces the honor system in Snyder Hall 
during its habitation. 



THE PIANIST CLUB 




Lighthall 


Bartley 


Home 


Richardson 


Fisher 


Harmon 



Witt Coman 

Flanagan Dodd 

Payne Miss Bowden Dean Meyer 



Merriman 


Roberson 


Houston 


Hyer 


Roberts 


Brannies 


Withers 


Caswell 


Wunderle 



OFFICERS 

DEAN MEYER Councillor 

MISS IOLA BOWDEN Councillor 

BILLY PAYNE President 

ELIZABETH HARMON Vice President 

RUTH BRANNIES Secretary 

AGNES ANN HYER Treasurer 



^> 



The Pianist Club is an honorary society in the School of Music. Students 
qualify for membership by successful performance of classical selections and 
by general excellence of their work. 



THE CAMPUS CRUSADE 

The Crusade is a new organization on the Southwestern University Cam- 
pus and has telescoped its ideals as an advocate for increased Christian 
Spirit on the Campus. This organization is a spontaneous outgrowth of spiritual 
impetus exerted by the combined efforts of boys and girls interested in the 
Christian spirit of the school. 




Clark 
Vice-President 



Harris 
Program Chairman 



Lawler 
President 



Smith 
Business Manager 



', 



i^Swff^i 



DEBATE 



Pi Kappa Delta is a debating society organized by members of the Varsity 
Debate Team, whose members are interested in furthering the interests of the 
Speech Arts. This group attended the National Convention of the Pi Kappa 
Delta at Knoxville, Tennessee. 




Lott 



Stanford Wilkinson 

Sneed Martin 



Hays 



Gipson 



THE MEGAPHONE 




Cates 
Wyatt 




STANFORD 



i 

I 




mm 

ROBINSON 



-o 



THE MEGAPHONE STAFF 

ED STANFORD Editor 

MILTON ROBINSON Business Manager 

DERRILL LEE CATES Editor-Elect 

ALBERT WILLIAMS Business-Manager-Elect 

BILLIE DORIS HAYS Associate Editor 

LORIECE DANIELS ... Assistant Editor 

COLLEEN WYATT Assistant Editor 

OLIVER COLE .... Assistant Editor 

LILY LAYNE COLEMAN ' Society Editor 

GLORIA HAWKER Society Editor 

CHARLES POWELL , . . . Sports Editor 

SAM HOLMES Assistant Sports Editor 

HENRY T. MYERS Assistant Sports Editor 

MARJORIE FISHER Exchange and Circulation Manager 



REPORTERS 

Mary Torn Neal, Elizabeth Amsler, Alice Pieper, Marjorie Fisher, 
Joy Torbett, Betty Lewis, Spencer Meredith, Jimmie Wylie, Laura 
Nell Key, Sam Southwell, Margaiet Hull. 



THE SOU WESTER 




Harris 



Powell 



Grieger 



Bishop 



Home 



Karr Smith 

McKinnon 



Lott 



Hull 



Cates 



^> 



THE 1940 SOU'WESTER STAFF 

Editor LAUNCELOT BAILEY 

Business Manager GEORGE FOSTER 

Editor-Elect ED HARRIS 

Business Manager-Elect CHARLIE POWELL 

Staff Photographer LEE KARR 

Assistant Business Manager BILLY SMITH 

Associate Editor MICKEY LOTT 

Assistant Editor JOYCE GRIEGER 

Assistant Editor MARTHA LOU BISHOP 

Assistant Editor ELSIE WAYNE HORNE 

Feature Editor MARY MARTHA McKINNON 

Feature Editor MARGARET HULL 

Sports Editor DERRILL LEE CATES 




BAILEY 




FOSTER 



THE SOUTHWESTERN MAGAZINE 




MYERS 




THE SOUTHWESTERN MAGAZINE STAFF 

HENRY T. MYERS Editor 

ROBERT RENTFRO Business Manager 

HAL ANDERSON Editor-Elect 

BILLY SMITH Business Manager-Elect 

BETH BRISCOE Associate Editor 

SAM HOLMES Associate Editor 

CARL BERGQUIST Art Editor 

ALLEN BARR Feature Editor 



RENTFRO 



Bailey, President 



THE BARB ASSOCIATION 




Foster 



Bracey 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

McMurry 



Lott 



Hays 



Rodgers 



The Barb Association is an independent organization composed of all non- 
fraternity and non-sorority students. This group has organized to become a 
potent force upon the campus. The members elect an executive council of 
seven members who handle the administrative affairs of the group. 



ALPHA DELTA PI 




Alburtis 


Anderson 


Mickle 


Brockette 


Whitcomb 


Wasson 


Denson 


Whitley 


Morrow 


Wood 


Lokey 


Laughlin 


Mann 


Brady 


Terrell 


Patterson 


McKinnon 


Madely 


Daniels 


Briley 


Fisher 


Chapman 


Wilcox 


Winfrey 


Baggett 


Flanagan 


Wood 


Britt 


Johnson 


Walkup 


Lighthall 


Maxwell 


Cooke 


Corey- 


Mote 


Torbett 


Robertson 


Richardson 


Baker 


Wunderle 


Dozier 


Walsh 


Fisher 


Maas Chambless Wilkinson Wilkinson 


McKinnon 


Wood 



Founded 1851, Macon, Georgia 

Colors: Blue and White 

Flower: Violet 



President MARY JANE WHITCOMB 

Vice-President ELIZABETH McKINNON 

Secretary MARGARET BAKER 

Treasurer - FRANCES MAAS 



ALPHA DELTA PI 



Elizabeth Wasson 
Mary Elizabeth Anderson 
Betty Gaynell Dozier 
Frances Maas 
Marjorie Fisher 
Christine Chambless 
Margaret Baker 
Helen Wilkinson 
Helen Ruth Wunderle 
Flo Fisher 
Vitula Wilcox 
Lorraine Alburtis 
Genevieve Britt 
Joy Torbett 
Faye Morrow 
Jane Wood 
Bertha Wood 
DeLouise Chapman 
Marion Walkup 
Nan Mickle 
Fredericka Roberson 
Mathilda Brady 
Loriece Daniels 



Bernice Laughlin 
Hazel Wood 
Gladys Wilkinson 
Mary Jane Whitcomb 
June Walsh 
Lenair Richardson 
Evangeline Patterson 
Elizabeth McKinnon 
Mary Martha McKinnon 
Billie Sue Madeley 
Wanda Winfrey 
Marian Lighthall 
Jacquelin Corey 
Juanita Whitley 
Luella Mann 
Posey Baggett 
Alice Ann Maxwell 
Maurine Johnson 
Mary Lokey 
Dorothy Sue Mote 
Evelyn Cooke 
Elizabeth Flanagan 
Mary Joe Briley 




I 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 




McCall 
Hawker 
Davis 
Withers 



Tucker 
Bartlett 
Bando 
Moore 

Eagle 



Johnston 
Sterling 
Repschleger 
Azwell 

Williams 



Mabry 
Glenn 
Wyche 
Robbins 



Minter 



Briscoe 
Barton 
Bartlett 
Thompson 



Horn 



Coleman 
McGuire 
Barr 
Hughes 



Harrison 
Moore 
Crow 
Terry 
Carter 



Barr 
Harmon 
McKinney 
Tyree 



Founded 1898, Farmersville, Virginia 

Lambda Installed 1906 

Colors: Turquoise Blue and Sieel Gray 

Flowers: White Violet 



President ALLENE BARR 

Vice-President FRANCES WITHERS 

Secretary JANE THOMPSON 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 



Grace McKinney 
Sara McCall 
Judy Barton 
Frances Davis 
Jane Thomson 
Emily Jane Tucker 
Elizabeth' Harrison 
Beth Briscoe 
Mary Louise Hughes 
Anna Minter 
Mittie Sue Carter 
Elanor Moore 
Betsy Bartlett 
Ruth Azwell 
Bilie Repschleger 
Virginia Crow 
Fay McGuire 
Gerry Glenn 



Marie Bartlett 
Marjorie Terry 
Dorothy Eagle 
Allene Barr 
Genevieve Barr 
Elizabeth Harmon 
Frances Withers 
Bernice Sterling 
Gloria Hawker 
Mary Gene Mabry 
Lily Lane Coleman 
Jane Robbins 
Zelda Williams 
Virginia Wyche 
Peggy Moore 
Jean Tyree 
Nancy Bando 
Kathleen Horn 




DELTA DELTA DELTA 




Wardlaw 


Hull 




Rolston 


Askey 


Nail 




Key 


Welch 


Hunt 


Lewis 




Mitchell 


Pieper 


Smith 




Campbell 


Neal 


Cogdell 


Mints 




Witt 


MacBlain 


Hyer 




Titsworth 


McKay 


Armsby 


Wetzel 




Fly 


Walden 


Wyatt 




Pittman 


Merriman 


Shivers 




Quinn 


Burgin 


Murray 




Nixon 


Hutcherson 





Founded 1888, Boston, Massachusetts 

Theta Epsilon Installed 1911 

Colors: Silver, Gold, and Blue 

Flower: Pansy 



President BETTY WELCH 

Secretary FRANCES NIXON 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 



i 



Mary Wardlaw 
Betty Welch 
Betty Lewis 
Laura Nell Key 
Mary Tom Neal 
Nonnie Hutcherson 
Audrey MacBlain 
Margaret Hull 
Ola Nan Shaw- 
Martha Ann Nail 
Corine Wetzel 
Frances Fly 
Helen Bergin 
Betty Jean Merriman 
Elizabeth Amsler 



Doris McKay 
Alice Pieper 
Frances Nixon 
Netta Jane Smith 
Myra Lou Hunt 
Mary Louise Mitchell 
Frances Askey 
Margery Mints 
Effie Shivers 
Mary Sue Witt 
La Verne Walden 
Agnes Heyer 
Colleen Wyatt 
Rosemary Ralston 
Jackie Titsworth 




KAPPA SIGMA 






■: ' 


f #» # 




Manford 
Strange 

Blalock 


Boyd 
Barton 

Edwards 
McLane 



Price 


Moore 


Muecke 


Williams 


Manford 


Johnston 


Dodd 


Coman 


Wolfe 


Runnels 


Cartwright 





Founded 1869, University of Virginia 

lots Installed 1886 

Colors: Scarlet, Green, and White 

Flower: Lily of the Valley 



Grand Master PAT MANFORD 

Grand Proctorator WILLIAM MOORE 

Grand Master of Ceremonies JIMMY PRICE 

Grand Treasurer NEWELL BOYD 

Grand Scribe WESLEY MUECKE 






KAPPA SIGMA 



INITIATES 



Pat Manford 
Newell Boyd 
Leslie Strange 
Bobby Barton 
Albert Williams 
Miller Manford 
Harry Johnston 
Walter Presley 



Wes Muecke, Jr. 
Billy Moore 
Jimmy Price 
Jesse Blalock 
Dain Edwards 
David Dodd 
Jack Coman 



PLEDGES 



Ernest McLane 
Cab Wolfe 
Ed Leavitt 



Holman Cartwright 
Vernon Runnels 





II 



if* 



- - >* 



PHI DELTA THETA 




Sneed 


Rentfro 


Morelle Holbert 


Magee 


Wolfe 


Ingram 


Henderson 


Anderson 


Anderson Bland 


Cox 


McKinnon 


Childress 


Bergquist 


Burrus 


Stone Rhodes 


Gray 


Colbert 


Cluck 


McLeod 


Sehon 


Rocquemore 


Meyers 


Tyson 


Holland 



Founded 1848, Miami University 

Colors: Argent and Azure 

Flower: White Carnation 



President JOE SNEED 

Treasurer JOHN MORELLE 



PHI DELTA THETA 



Joe Sneed 
Bob Rentfro 
John Morelle 
Buddy Holbert 
Tom Wolfe 
Charles Ingram 
Marvin Henderson 
Grady Anderson 
Hal Anderson 



Roy Bland 
Sam Cox 
Carl Bergquist 
John McKinnon 
John Childress 
Gene Burrus 
Micky Stone 
Rodney Meyer 
Sam Tyson 



Frank Sehon 
Gordon McLeod 
Abb Rhodes 
Phil Gray 
Evans Holland 
Fred Roquemore 
James Colbert 
John Cluck 



SS^** 3 ^ 





Scarborough 

Fannin 

Carter 



Billhartz 
Mims 
Peebles 
Stanford 



Smith 
Melbert 
Betts 
Barr 



Brigman 
Gipson 
Myers 
Reed 



Dosier 
Crews 
Gaddy 
Edens 



Wilson 
Holmes 
Tinsley 



KAPPA ALPHA 



Founded in 1865, Washington and Lee University 

XI Installed 1883 

Colors: Crimson and Gold 

Flowers: Magnolia and Red Rose 



President 
Secretary . 



ED STANFORD 

. WILL HOUSTON TINSLEY 



KAPPA ALPHA 



Ed Stanford 
Howell Gaddy 
Henry T. Myers 
Will Houston Tinsley 
Floyd Betts 
Allen Barr 
George Carter 
Sam Holmes 



Byron Peebles 
Ernest Edens 
Paul Reed 
Franklin Crews 
Fred Brigman 
Elwyn Gipson 
James Melbert 



Joe Mims 
Harrell Bilhartz 
Burleigh Smith 
Charles Scarborough 
Price Dozier 
Ray Fannin 
Eddie Wilson 
James Rae 





Sister and girl exchange news and 
views on the editor . . . Why didn't 
you keep the skunk for a mascot? 
What's that? Evolution reversed 
. . . Oh boy, smile again . . . The 
editor officially hereby smirks at 
you, chump . . . Now Jummie, you 
aren't that bad off for a front are 
you? If we all had faces like 
Goodvin's we wouldn't hide them 
like that . . . Hmmm, haven't we 
met before? Oh yes, on the op- 
posite page . . . Billy gives us that 
old pep talk smile. 



On the board of observation . . . 
Ed grins ... Is this chapel time? 
Thrown over for a little snow . . . 
My, how domesticated they al- 
ready seem . . . Sisters in white 
. . . Hold on, Happy, what's the 
excitement? The great seal of 
Southwestern . . . Pan American 
float . . . Foster ponders how to 
add a word or word an ad . . . 
Just who would Betty be looking 
up to ... A popular setting for 
pictures ... A band from the 
hinterland . . . Happy birthday to 
you, Southwestern ... 321 Chem 
boys find a gold mine . . . Tubba 
looks over the barb float . . . 
Necessary accessories for study, 
for Jimmy Ferguson anyhow . . . 
My, how elegant . . . Going places, 
people? There's that heart again. 




Southwestern's co-education is suc- 
cessful . . . Four Humpty Dumpties 
. . . Medlenka rests . . . "Once 
there were three fishermen" . . . 
Gunn chumps off . . . No grass 
growing under their feet . . . Down 
but not out, good motto . . . Foot- 
ball Follywood Revue . . . Just be 
patient, girls . . . Three gals model 
campus styles . . . Quit looking 
so disgusted. 



Ye eastern portal ... Do they 
grow them on trees . . . Now just 
between us girls, what is so fun- 
ny? Ooops, a slip . . . Burrus 
squires one across the campus 
. . . Note the Palentolifictarontic 
cliff (why do people always look at 
the camera?) . . . Joyce Elaine steps 
out, betcher boots . . . Billie Marie 
has just thought of her 3,946,756th 
pun . . . Bob Pope learns in a 
hurry about the river . . . "Take 
a squint at de skoits on dem goils" 
. . . Ah, a soft focus on Harry . . . 
Riggs in a championship mumble- 
peg stance . . . She has her eye 
on something ... A big hearted 
Valentine . . . Red, what or who 
are you mad about . . . Sandherr 
holds it ... A couple of barbs . . . 
Leaving, Logan? Better leave the 
leaves alone . . . The Crosely is 
part of this years campus scenery 
. . . How woodsy . . . It's mine! 
Free freshman fems . . . Mob ap- 
proaches Tavern! Oh, oh, a quiz 
next period. 




The library is slipping — down the 
chute . . . Hey, watch out for 
splinters . . . North is skeptical . . . 
Richter and Reed offer their sup- 
port, to each other ... A crate of 
heavy reading matter . . . Wright 
and Brown go in strong for gar- 
dening . . . The lastest thing in li- 
braries, the Cody Memorial . . . 
They just up and trucked off with 
the whole library. 



Aha, proof that the editor worked 
on the annual . . . Let's go in, fel- 
lows . . . Alia en el rancho grande 
. . . Girls outing . . . Estes and 
Smith, don't give us any trouble 
. . . Ah, the life of pre-meds . . . 
Hmmm, that settled look . . . 
Doubly successful anglers, each 
... A bit of pre-dinner bull whets 
the appetite . . . Three heads are 
better than one . . . Roughhouse 
Dutch ... A lesson in physical 
education, note Ida Mae's soulful 
eyes . . . "Boo hoo, I dot something 
in my 'ittle eye." 




El Presidente takes a commanding 
position . . . Three football boys 
practice (brrr) forward passes . . . 
Think it will snow boys? The dish- 
washers would rather throw coast- 
ers and tea glasses at the waiters 
and vice-versa . . . Two little rein- 
dears foundered in the snow . . . 
Who dat? Ever hear of punch 
drunk? Well Buddy's punched with 
snow . . . Why you big lummox, 
let the ladies have your seat . . . 
Tot holds her own . . . That sinister 
Mr. Riggs is up to no good . . . 
Nonie's enjoying it all, including 
sledding. 



THE 1940 SOU'WESTER 



f-^reientd 



^rddhotd and S^nupdhou 



'Mi 



Compliments of 



616 CONGRESS 
AUSTIN'S LEADING STORE FOR MEN 



: I 




CUDDLIN' COUPLES 




Founded 1874 



LIBRARY EQUIPMENT 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 



stsj 



Vdn Boeckmamv-Jimes Compmy 



110 East Ninth 



Austin, Texas 



WILCOX BROTHERS 



JEWELERS . . . BOOKS 



STATIONERS 



WAT C H 


AND 


JEWELRY 


REPAIRING 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF UNIVERSITY BOOKS 
AND SUPPLIES - - ALSO A NICE LINE OF JEWELRY. 



A Pleasure to Serve You 



GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 





G 
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VERYONE 



G 



LAN CE 



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O 



N OUR 




EIGHBORLY 




OLLEGE 






TMOSPHERE AND 



F 



INE 



E 



ATS 



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Mr. and Mrs. Warren Redford 

"POP & MOM" 



A 






FACIAL FOLLIES 



HUMBLE 



THE HUMBLE COMPANY 



A Texas Institutio 



n 



extends to the class of 1940 its hearty 
congratulations. May you find in your 
life's work both happiness and success. 



Compliments of 



JESSE H. JONES 



Compliments of 



R. BRUCE (Nick) CARTER 

SOUTHWESTERN EX 
'11 -'15 



RICE AID LAMAR HOTELS 

HOUSTON 



PIONEERING TEXAS 

• This company, a pioneer in the field of sulphur production, salutes South- 
western University, its officials, its students and alumni upon a hundred years 
of educational progress. Truly a pioneer in the field of education, Southwestern 
will continue to rank as one of Texas' outstanding Universities. 

TEXAS GULF SULPHUR COMPANY, Inc. 

Producers of crude sulphur 



. 




A CHEERFUL GROUP — WHAT? 



iin 



l/Ulten in ^rudti 

Be Among the Guests of 

MERRITT-MBOURS CD. 

That Popular Store for Men 



WOMEN SHOPPERS ESPECIALLY WELCOME 



EDWARDS 
CAFE 



For Regular Meals 
or Banquets 



EDWARDS 
MARKET 



For Barbeques 
and Picnics 



LJn +y t& KJne J^rundredth ^rnniverAary 



John Bremond Company 



. . . . *25ervina S^oulhwesL 



9 



ern 



GUGENHEIM GOLDSMITH CO. 



WHOLESALE FRUIT 
AND PRODUCE 



AUSTIN. TEXAS 



410 East 3rd St.. 



L. D. 28 



J. H. REED MUSIC CD. 



"Your Friends 9 ' 

Since 1901 



AUSTIN 



TEXAS 




y^onara tu la L 



lond 

To Alumni, Faculty, and Student Body 
of Southwestern on its one hundredth 
anniversary. 



THE DRISKILL HOTEL 



W. L. STARK, Manager 




INTIMATE GLIMPSES 



l/wlten, in after uearS, 



you turn the pages of this Sou'Wester, 
the history of the 1939-40 class, and view the photographs of old friends and 
acquaintances, may this familiar slogan . . . 



^Jlte S^ian of- Ljood (^lotheA 



yy 




that has appeared in all your college publications, again come to your mind, 
and your friends and supporters at this store that features the newest of col- 
lege styles while they are new. 



9 




._*, 



■1 fc jk.+-. _-; 



MErfS 
Clothing! — - •. 
shoes to hat5^ ^ 






CONGRATULATIONS to SOUTHWESTERN 

its fOOtn ^rnniverc 



on 



*Saru 



III 

ii ill pi 

■ 




... 

Ill 



lit 

if 
If 




TRDY LAUNDRY 



cfDru i^le 



eanerd 



2> 



v 



erd 




'J? 



C 



C.E. HARRIS, Manager 



On Jts food Jb 



nnii/erdari 



v 



WE SALUTE YOU 



DODGE 




PLYMOUTH 



FREUND MOTOR CO. 

TELEPHONE 111 "Good Service Since 1920" GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 




TWO SOMES 



GOLD'S... 



DEPARTMENT STDHE 



Best Quality for the Price 



GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 




INDUSTRIAL TEXAS! We've heard plans discussed 
. . . we've seen much progress. Vet the average 
Texan probably would be surprised to learn that an in- 
vestment of over seven hundred millio>i dollars already 
has been made toward building a new kind of Texas! 

Thuc with this seven hundred million dollar in- 
vestment, Texas business leaders have the key to open 
Texas' new industrial era. 

Lone Star Gas Company was one of the first natural 
"as companies organized in Texas. It has pioneered 
in the development of Texas gas reserves, in methods 
oi transmission and distribution. Today, Lone Star 



to a new kind of Texas 



as Service is considered one of the finest in the 
world. Potent in building and maintaining this high 
standard of service is the factor of capital investment 
which Lone Star Gas System has made. It amounts to 
well over $-10,000.00 for each employee. 

Natural gas companies operating in Texas have 
invested in plants, gas reserves and equipment about 
$725,000,000.00 in making available a dependable sup- 
ply of natural gas to homes, business houses and in- 
dustrial plants. Already over 6,000 Texas industrial 
plants are using this clean, low-cost fuei service for 
heat and power. When one stops to consider the in- 
estimable benefits this huge investment has brought 
already to land owners, homes, business and industry 
some idea of its significance in today's efforts to build 
a greater industrial Texas can be seen. 

LONE STAR 



LONE STAR US COMPANY 




GAS SYSTEM 




"When your car gets cranky 
At one hundred thousand miles, 
Come by to see me 
And I'll make you all smiles.' 



Gulf Service Station 

A. E. "Red" Lindell 




Compliments of 



MU8; 



CLEANERS- DYERS 



GEORGETOWN TEXAS 




PICNICKIN 



^Jhe f-^ortrait i^utd 



in this and previous issues of 

^Jne ^5ou wedter 

are from negatives made by 

STDNE'S STUDID 

GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 



All negatives have been preserved and any style pictures can be 
had by communicating with us 



"Again we hail thee, mother dear, 

Hail to thee, Southwestern, 
Thy sons are loyal, never fear, 

Loyal to Southwestern. 
We'll ne'er forget thy fost'ring care, 

The quiet hour of morning prayer, — 
The ringing call to service there 

Back in old Southwestern." 



fi 



i»ii© 




A dedication to the past achievements of the oldest 
institution of higher learning in Texas, and an invoca- 
tion to Southwestern University as it faces its prospects 
for another century of progress and service. 



A. r\. rvliiam 




SCIENTISTS — ? 



DRY CLEANERS 

Cleaners you will enjoy 
doing business with 



Woodie Patrick 



Phone 381 



CATES PRINT SHOP 

Cafes for Best Printing 
GEORGETOWN 



Bill Heard's Service Station 

SINCLAIR PRODUCTS 



"ABIE" RHODES BARBER 
SHOP 



^altowitxj^roj 



AIN AT RUSK 




The South's most 
outstanding store 
for men's and 
women's and chil- 
dren's apparel. 



Occupying the 
first six floors of 
the magnificent 
Gulf Building. 



HOUSTON 



Congratulations to Southwestern 



on its One Hundredth Anniversary 



iSMESSS 



WHERE GEORGETOWN IS ENTERTAINED 



THE PIRATE TAVERN 




Koea®®Qe*< 



A Rendezvous for Rogues 

and 
A Pirouetting Place for Pirates 



©<5®<S®^ 




LEROY RUBY 




DAYTIME RIVEROLOGY 



Compliments of 

R. H. "Bob" Folmar 

General Contractor 

Cody Memorial Library • West Gymnasium 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 



TEXAS SERVICE STATION 

TEXACO PRODUCTS 



TAXI SERVICE 



Abner Munson 



Phone 560 



Albert Munson 



The Farmers State Bank 
df georgetown, texas 



1 fr 




4 



^>'1»-...- 




A. A. ALLEN 

Vice-President 



— The third oldest State Bank in Texas salutes the 100th anniversary of the old- 
est college or university in Texas — Southwestern. 

Along with Southwestern this bank has stood the acid test for safety, service, 
and dependability over the years and through every money panic, depression and 
recession for over forty years. Upon this record may we serve you. 

An agency of the Government guarantees each deposit in this bank up to and 
including $5,000.00. 



THE 1940 SOU'WESTER COVERS 

WERE MADE BY 

UNIVERSAL 
BOOK BINDERY, INC. 



Broadway at Third St. 



San Antonio 



Compliments of 

SOUTHWEST 
TELEPHONE 
COMPANY 



Compliments of 

THE ROCK THEATRE 

Round Rock, Texas 



Acme Dry Cleaners 

Cleans the Cleanest 
GEORGETOWN TEXAS 



EVERYTHING TO WEAR 

Nationally Known Lines 

Hoffman & Son 

GEORGETOWN 



HODGES BROTHERS 
DRUGS 

REXALL STORE 



CONGRATULATIONS TO SOUTHWESTERN 

on Its 100th Anniversary 

We're Behind You All the Way 




AROUND THE CAMPUS 



SAM BASS CAFE 
AND CHICKEN GARDEN 

WINGLESS, NECKLESS. BACKLESS 
CHICKEN DINNERS 

Round Rock, Texas Phone 15 


Compliments of 

Belfdhd Lumber 
Cdmpmy 

TELEPHONE 34 

• 
GEORGETOWN 


~ EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC 
■LhhlJ PHOTO FINISHING 

HHL ELLISTON PHOTO CO. 

615 Congress Austin 


FOR RAPID SERVICE AND 
GOOD WORKMANSHIP— SEE 

GEORGETOWN ELECTRIC 
SHOE SHOP 


CAL'S - ? 



d^est wishes for the continued advance- 
t and Increasing Service to Its students 



men 



for Southwestern Ulnluersltu. 



?? 



' 




HOMECOMING PARADE 



-ST cJurua S^tore 


cJLonalno 


that pictures the progress of 


Southwestern University and 


PRODUCE COMPANY 


Georgetown by its service and 




friendly spirit. 


• 


§> 


Supplies Southwestern 


l>> 


with Poultry and Eggs 


HIHSHS 


• 


PHONE 78 


Telephone 655 



■ _ — - — 

3n tke paiilna years if Y ou ha PP en to ^ ance over these 

words, may they bring back happy memories of "the 
coke dates", dancing, laughing, loving, and living at 

TOMMY EOOPER S DRUG STORE 


DARBY ORGAIN 

Southwestern Ex 
Invites You to "Unlax" at 

OLD MADRID 

Austin. Texas Dial 84321 


Visit 

ETHEL'S BEAUTY LAND 

For 

All Beauty Treatments 

Back of Tavern Phone 148 J 


PALACE BARBER SHOP 


BEN NEWMAN'S 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Dry Goods 
Georgetown Texas 


EDENS BROS. GROCERY 


SHELL — THE FLORIST 


PIGGLY WIGGLY 

Everything for Your Parties 
or Picnics 

ONE STOP FOOD STORE 


WILCOX GROCERY 


SHAW GROCERY 


AHLDERE & SONS 

Humble Products 
ALL KINDS OF REPAIR WORK 


WARD'S SHOE SERVICE 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
GEORGETOWN. TEXAS 


BLUE MOON 

Hamburgers - Cigarettes - Cold Drinks 
"UNCLE ED" 


Compliments of 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

1890-1940 
MEMBER F. D. I. C. 




A. G. BRAIN MOTOR CO. 


//aw AV*rt **/// 
iik-Jjj ' 

SALES AND SERVICE 
O. K. USED CARS 

GEORGETOWN TEXAS 


Hail to Southwestern on Its 
100th Year of Progress 

OW E N S O N O e RVICE 

Qfood mart Ot a t I o n 

Phone 3 


Compliments of 

YOUNG'S DAIRY 

Supplies Southwestern With Milk 


CLUB SERENE 

Where — Music is Softer 
Food is Better 
Life is Gayer 


T. H. WILLIAMS 

Austin's Largest Store Exclusively 
For Women 

Fifth and Congress Austin 



uaf at the . . . 

SOUTHWESTERN 
BOARDING HOUSE 



"THE FOOD IS JUST 

LIKE MOTHER MAKES' 



"Ask the Boys 

That Eat There" 



MRS. McLEAN 



Across the Street from University 



Trade With 
OUR ADVERTISERS 



Compliments of 

Georgetown Oil Mill 

M. F. SMITH, Mgr. 



Compliments of 

Dr. Howard Wheeler, M.D. 



Physician 



Surgeon 



DR. HOBSON MARTIN 

Dentist City 



VISIT YOUR 

Western Auto Associate 
Store 



BUCHHOLZ 

Exclusive Shoppe for Women 



Printers for Southwestern 



THE SIM 



(Est. 1877) 



A Staunch Supporter of 

Southwestern for 

63 Years 



TELEPHONE 98 



^Jhe f940 ^ou wester 



PRINTED BY 



F. L. MOTHERAL CD. 



1304 Throckmorton Fort Worth, Texas 



C^naraulnaS II Vlucie (J^ty 



WALLACE ENGRAVING CD 



AUSTIN, TEXAS 










I